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Q:
I was searching online a while ago to see how someone finds the right set of arrows for a bow. I have heard and seen that the wrong set of arrows can make a difference in accuracy, speed and penetration for bows ( bigger is not always better). I have witnessed someone shooting big arrows that all they did was either; bounce off the target or barley hangs in by the tip while at the same time, spraying the target allover!(outfitted by some small outdoor shop). Then another shooter gave him his arrows that were lighter and the guy started to not only tightly group his arrows but penetrate farther into the target!! This makes me wonder how many people are being sold the wrong arrows. This is the one fact that I believe WILL change a shooters accuracy and killing power. I just wanted to shout out to those who aren’t aware of this. Here is a link to a very informative article about arrow sizing and other info about them.. http://www.huntersfriend.com/carbon_arrows/hunting_arrows_selection_guide_chapter_1.htm

from MNwhitetailHunter on 01.02.13

Answers (6)

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from 6phunter wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

proper penetration can only be achieved if the arrow is flying straight,paper tuning your arrows is the first step in arrow flight and sighting in new ones.

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from JM wrote 1 year 15 weeks ago

-An easy way to check aluminum arrows for straightness is take off the broadhead and roll it along a flat table.
-For some reason the link is not working for me, so sorry if this was mentioned in the article.

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from DSMbirddog wrote 1 year 15 weeks ago

I've heard about that bending issue as well. I've never checked straightness and for my purposes when just hunting I don't think it is an issue. The arrows I use for hunting are kept just for that purpose so they only get shot maybe 5 times in practice. Practicing will take a toll on your arrows anyway. When they get unuseable I rotate them out until I need to buy six more and the new ones are dedicated to hunting. Des Moines.

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from huntfishtrap wrote 1 year 15 weeks ago

Yes, everything matters if you're trying to wring all the performance you can out of your archery setup. In general, the heavier the draw weight of the bow, the heavier and stiffer-spined the arrows should be. And the reverse is true as well.

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from MNwhitetailHunter wrote 1 year 15 weeks ago

i remember that you mentioned that you shoot aluminum arrows..later on in the article it said something about aluminum arrows will start to bend after time b/c of the force put on them, do u see that happening with your arrows?

btw, what does DSM stand for?

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from DSMbirddog wrote 1 year 15 weeks ago

Yes, you are correct. Another factor is if the bow is tuned to let the arrow fly point first and not wobbling. Arrow weight, spine, and fletching are all important in making. Another issue with compound bows is limb tuning.

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from huntfishtrap wrote 1 year 15 weeks ago

Yes, everything matters if you're trying to wring all the performance you can out of your archery setup. In general, the heavier the draw weight of the bow, the heavier and stiffer-spined the arrows should be. And the reverse is true as well.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 1 year 15 weeks ago

-An easy way to check aluminum arrows for straightness is take off the broadhead and roll it along a flat table.
-For some reason the link is not working for me, so sorry if this was mentioned in the article.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 6phunter wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

proper penetration can only be achieved if the arrow is flying straight,paper tuning your arrows is the first step in arrow flight and sighting in new ones.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MNwhitetailHunter wrote 1 year 15 weeks ago

i remember that you mentioned that you shoot aluminum arrows..later on in the article it said something about aluminum arrows will start to bend after time b/c of the force put on them, do u see that happening with your arrows?

btw, what does DSM stand for?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 1 year 15 weeks ago

I've heard about that bending issue as well. I've never checked straightness and for my purposes when just hunting I don't think it is an issue. The arrows I use for hunting are kept just for that purpose so they only get shot maybe 5 times in practice. Practicing will take a toll on your arrows anyway. When they get unuseable I rotate them out until I need to buy six more and the new ones are dedicated to hunting. Des Moines.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 1 year 15 weeks ago

Yes, you are correct. Another factor is if the bow is tuned to let the arrow fly point first and not wobbling. Arrow weight, spine, and fletching are all important in making. Another issue with compound bows is limb tuning.

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