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Answers

Q:
i shoot a mossberg 270 and use a 130 grain ballistics tip bullet. i shoot mostly two hundred to four hundred yards but have occassional yards one fifty and below. what yardage should i set the zero in on my scope to be able to feel comfortable shooting both?

from mike29058 on 10.11.09

Answers (6)

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from deerslayer01 wrote 3 years 19 weeks ago

set the sights to shoot 2-1/2 inches high at 100yds. That way you can hold dead on from 100 to 350 or 400 yds. I also shoot a 270. My rifle is a sako finnbear.

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from Johnnie wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

The following information is gathered from a Sierra Rifle Reloading Manual.
Your maximum point blank range zero would be 315 yards for a 130 grain spitzer boat tail bullet traveling at 3100 feet per second at the muzzle. Sight in 3.79 inches high at 100 yards and you will be in the kill zone between muzzle and 370 yards with a line of sight drop of 8.58 inch at 400 yards. At 400 yards the bullet will be 3.58 inches below the kill zone. On deer the kill zone is 5 inches above and 5 inches below the aiming point of the vital zone as the deer is standing broadside to the hunter.
Hope this has been of help. Good luck and good shooting!

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from Bo wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Well said, Kody. I am a student of Jim Carmichael and as such elected to go with the recommendation in a little book he wrote oh, probably 20 plus yrs ago for Federal Cartridge Company, called the Federal Deer Hunter's Guide. He recommended the 6" window and it seemed like a good idea so I ran with it. Much easier than trying to range your target and then hoping you were close. I have been doing it so long it would be hard to change now.
I use Hornady ammo and all of their 130 gr .270 cartidges have a MV greater than 3000fps. I like the 140gr light Magnum as it has a MV of 3100.. Over the years I have gone to just using Hornady Ammo in my hunting rifles and handguns.
I have neither the time nor the space to reload anymore.

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from Kody wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Let's quote the old guru of the ,270 - probably Bo's idol! Jack O'Connor did most of his "mountain hunting with .270 rifles sighted to hit 4 inches high at 150 yards. The bullet is right at point of aim at 275 yards and only two inches low at 300. At 350 the bullet falls only 7 1/2 inches which means that a .270 so sighted has a point blank range of about 350 yards". That pretty much jives with Bo's calculations as Jack O'Connor had his pet 130 gr loads roaring out the barrel in excess of 3100 fps. I doubt that a regular factory load in 130 gr .270 will be above 3000 fps so I would use the Sierra manuals calculation of maximum point blank range of 350 yards with zero set at 290 yards. Just to clarify, point blank range is that range where the bullet will rise no higher than five inches above and below the line of sight. Meaning... if you hold smack on that animal's chest somewhere within 350 yards you have a 10 inch window to make the kill.. you can misjudge the range dramatically but has long as it is within that 350 yards you will not be more than 5 inches high or 5 inches low. As a deer's chest is more than 10 inches deep you can still make a killing shot.
Leopold has a beautiful system on their Vari -111 40 mm rifle scopes for finding ranges quickly. Frame the deer's chest with the duplex thicker outer crosshair using the magnification adjustment ring( the system assumes the deer's chest to be 18 inches deep) then check the corresponding numbers on the adjustment ring to identify yardage. Most of my flat shooting rifles have similar trajectories so knowing drop rates is not tuff to do. Who knew, the salesman didn't and I only figured it out because I read the instructions for a change!

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from Bo wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Depends on the muzzle velocity, I am shooting 140 gr Hornady Light Magnums, my muzzle velocity is in the 3000fps range. I sight my gun in at 100 yds, shooting 2.75" high. I believe point of maximum rise is around 147 yds. That is 3" above line of sight. It crosses line of sight at somewhere between 245 and 250 yds. At 296 yds I am at 3" below line of sight. That gives me a point blank window out to 300yds.
I am citing these numbers from memory and they may not be exact, but it will be close. If you know someone who has a ballistics program, you can plug in the numbers for your gun and print out all of the data you need for the round you are shooting. Good luck and good shooting.

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from Taylor Pommier wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

i would sight it in at 200 yards with a real flat shooter like your .270 it will be barely off at 100 and you should have no problems shootiing close

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from Taylor Pommier wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

i would sight it in at 200 yards with a real flat shooter like your .270 it will be barely off at 100 and you should have no problems shootiing close

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from Bo wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Depends on the muzzle velocity, I am shooting 140 gr Hornady Light Magnums, my muzzle velocity is in the 3000fps range. I sight my gun in at 100 yds, shooting 2.75" high. I believe point of maximum rise is around 147 yds. That is 3" above line of sight. It crosses line of sight at somewhere between 245 and 250 yds. At 296 yds I am at 3" below line of sight. That gives me a point blank window out to 300yds.
I am citing these numbers from memory and they may not be exact, but it will be close. If you know someone who has a ballistics program, you can plug in the numbers for your gun and print out all of the data you need for the round you are shooting. Good luck and good shooting.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bo wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Well said, Kody. I am a student of Jim Carmichael and as such elected to go with the recommendation in a little book he wrote oh, probably 20 plus yrs ago for Federal Cartridge Company, called the Federal Deer Hunter's Guide. He recommended the 6" window and it seemed like a good idea so I ran with it. Much easier than trying to range your target and then hoping you were close. I have been doing it so long it would be hard to change now.
I use Hornady ammo and all of their 130 gr .270 cartidges have a MV greater than 3000fps. I like the 140gr light Magnum as it has a MV of 3100.. Over the years I have gone to just using Hornady Ammo in my hunting rifles and handguns.
I have neither the time nor the space to reload anymore.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Johnnie wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

The following information is gathered from a Sierra Rifle Reloading Manual.
Your maximum point blank range zero would be 315 yards for a 130 grain spitzer boat tail bullet traveling at 3100 feet per second at the muzzle. Sight in 3.79 inches high at 100 yards and you will be in the kill zone between muzzle and 370 yards with a line of sight drop of 8.58 inch at 400 yards. At 400 yards the bullet will be 3.58 inches below the kill zone. On deer the kill zone is 5 inches above and 5 inches below the aiming point of the vital zone as the deer is standing broadside to the hunter.
Hope this has been of help. Good luck and good shooting!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerslayer01 wrote 3 years 19 weeks ago

set the sights to shoot 2-1/2 inches high at 100yds. That way you can hold dead on from 100 to 350 or 400 yds. I also shoot a 270. My rifle is a sako finnbear.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kody wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Let's quote the old guru of the ,270 - probably Bo's idol! Jack O'Connor did most of his "mountain hunting with .270 rifles sighted to hit 4 inches high at 150 yards. The bullet is right at point of aim at 275 yards and only two inches low at 300. At 350 the bullet falls only 7 1/2 inches which means that a .270 so sighted has a point blank range of about 350 yards". That pretty much jives with Bo's calculations as Jack O'Connor had his pet 130 gr loads roaring out the barrel in excess of 3100 fps. I doubt that a regular factory load in 130 gr .270 will be above 3000 fps so I would use the Sierra manuals calculation of maximum point blank range of 350 yards with zero set at 290 yards. Just to clarify, point blank range is that range where the bullet will rise no higher than five inches above and below the line of sight. Meaning... if you hold smack on that animal's chest somewhere within 350 yards you have a 10 inch window to make the kill.. you can misjudge the range dramatically but has long as it is within that 350 yards you will not be more than 5 inches high or 5 inches low. As a deer's chest is more than 10 inches deep you can still make a killing shot.
Leopold has a beautiful system on their Vari -111 40 mm rifle scopes for finding ranges quickly. Frame the deer's chest with the duplex thicker outer crosshair using the magnification adjustment ring( the system assumes the deer's chest to be 18 inches deep) then check the corresponding numbers on the adjustment ring to identify yardage. Most of my flat shooting rifles have similar trajectories so knowing drop rates is not tuff to do. Who knew, the salesman didn't and I only figured it out because I read the instructions for a change!

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