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Q:
Would you recommend a Glock as an entry level handgun?

from pbshooter1217 on 04.24.10

Answers (9)

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from fudge wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

A Glock is a great entry level gun...Things to consider is how if feels in your hands-is it too big, heavy; the price; can you safely handle the weapon-ie recoil...go to a range that rents handguns, try as many as you want or can or afford to try...pick one, whether its a Glock or something else...take a class from a GOOD instructor and do what you want

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from pbshooter1217 wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

The gun would most likely would just be used at the range or behind the house plinking. I'm in college right now so I can't really carry it around with me and it can't really be too expensive. I think a 9mm would be a good caliber for just target shooting.

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from Bo wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

Again, I would start with a revolver. But the next question is, what will the purpose of the handgun be?
Is it is for self defense, hunting or target shooting?
Self defense? I would definitely say a revolver. I would suggest something that can shoot more than one caliber, like a .357. But I would also say not to shoot a lot of .357 loads. There is too much penetration and you could kill a neighbor trying to protect yourself. For ammo in that situation, Mag-Safe ammo works very well, it will break apart and not go through seventeen walls and kill your neighbor. It is kind of pricey, but if it for self defense and you are worried about the cost, check out the cost of a funeral.
For hunting? I would choose a 6" (minimum) .44 magnum. You can start out shooting .44 Special and get a feel for the gun. I am not a big fan of .357 for hunting. A .44 magnum is a very good deer gun if you are not going to be shooting much more than a hundred yards. But I am biased, and I admit it.
For target shooting, something like a K-38 Masterpiece will fill the bill. This is not exhaustive and is one man's preference. I am sure there will be some dissent from my recommendations and that is fine, I will not claim to have more knowledge than anyone else. These kinds of decisions are personal and what works for me may not work for you.

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from pbshooter1217 wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

By entry level, I meant a moderate priced decent gun. I don't think I should spend over a thousand on a Sig, 1911, H&K, or some of the other nicer handguns, as I do not know if I will pursue the sport. I like to shoot skeet and I started off with an 870 Express, then I upgraded to a Premier Sporting 1100. I guess you could say I'm looking for the 870 Express of handguns.

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from Kody wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

As the question focuses upon entry level meaning the user does not have much experience I believe Bo has best addressed the matter. With any new endeavor it is hard to predict how much practice or effort to become proficient will be extended. Bo recommendation gives an inexperienced a reliable and simple alternative. "Keep it simple stupid" is a motto of many smart characters. I appreciate the longer barrels often associated with revolvers as the longer sight plane is helpful.

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from Meltonman wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

just bought the model 22 and love it that .40 cal packs a punch

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from cgull wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

I think the Glock will make an excellent 1st handgun. Use care as with any firearm and practice as much as you can. If a revolver suits you than by all means go with that, if you like autos then the GLock will be fine.

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from HawkEye wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

Bo nailed it on the head. I recommend a double action revolver as an entry level gun. As for which one? That is up to you. Consider size, weight, caliber...... I would recommend the .357 Magnum. Plenty of knock down power and the ability to shoot .38 Special loads to practice. Ruger, S&W, and Taurus make the best IMHO.

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from Bo wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

I would recommend a revolver as an entry level handgun. With any semi-auto, there are a variety of things that can cause Mr. Murphy to chose that moment to make an appearance. He never shows up at a time that it is not a big deal. In a time of stress, you don't need to have to stop and think about the next step.
With a revolver if you have a misfire, all you have to do is pull the trigger again. (That is assuming that it is a double action revolver.) There is no thinking did I have a stovepipe, or did the gun not pick up another round...? All you have to do is pull the trigger one more time and if your gun is loaded, odds are it will work.
I have a 1911 as my house gun. I carried one many years ago and have a pretty good feel for what needs to be done if it doesn't work when I need it to do so (i.e. Failure to feed, stovepipe, etc.) But, I was trained in the gun and I practiced many hours on what to do if the fan started spewing the brown stuff. If a person doesn't have that much time, pick a revolver, not only is it easier, it is more reliable in those times of high stress.

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from Bo wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

I would recommend a revolver as an entry level handgun. With any semi-auto, there are a variety of things that can cause Mr. Murphy to chose that moment to make an appearance. He never shows up at a time that it is not a big deal. In a time of stress, you don't need to have to stop and think about the next step.
With a revolver if you have a misfire, all you have to do is pull the trigger again. (That is assuming that it is a double action revolver.) There is no thinking did I have a stovepipe, or did the gun not pick up another round...? All you have to do is pull the trigger one more time and if your gun is loaded, odds are it will work.
I have a 1911 as my house gun. I carried one many years ago and have a pretty good feel for what needs to be done if it doesn't work when I need it to do so (i.e. Failure to feed, stovepipe, etc.) But, I was trained in the gun and I practiced many hours on what to do if the fan started spewing the brown stuff. If a person doesn't have that much time, pick a revolver, not only is it easier, it is more reliable in those times of high stress.

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from HawkEye wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

Bo nailed it on the head. I recommend a double action revolver as an entry level gun. As for which one? That is up to you. Consider size, weight, caliber...... I would recommend the .357 Magnum. Plenty of knock down power and the ability to shoot .38 Special loads to practice. Ruger, S&W, and Taurus make the best IMHO.

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from cgull wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

I think the Glock will make an excellent 1st handgun. Use care as with any firearm and practice as much as you can. If a revolver suits you than by all means go with that, if you like autos then the GLock will be fine.

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from Meltonman wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

just bought the model 22 and love it that .40 cal packs a punch

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from Kody wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

As the question focuses upon entry level meaning the user does not have much experience I believe Bo has best addressed the matter. With any new endeavor it is hard to predict how much practice or effort to become proficient will be extended. Bo recommendation gives an inexperienced a reliable and simple alternative. "Keep it simple stupid" is a motto of many smart characters. I appreciate the longer barrels often associated with revolvers as the longer sight plane is helpful.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from pbshooter1217 wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

By entry level, I meant a moderate priced decent gun. I don't think I should spend over a thousand on a Sig, 1911, H&K, or some of the other nicer handguns, as I do not know if I will pursue the sport. I like to shoot skeet and I started off with an 870 Express, then I upgraded to a Premier Sporting 1100. I guess you could say I'm looking for the 870 Express of handguns.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bo wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

Again, I would start with a revolver. But the next question is, what will the purpose of the handgun be?
Is it is for self defense, hunting or target shooting?
Self defense? I would definitely say a revolver. I would suggest something that can shoot more than one caliber, like a .357. But I would also say not to shoot a lot of .357 loads. There is too much penetration and you could kill a neighbor trying to protect yourself. For ammo in that situation, Mag-Safe ammo works very well, it will break apart and not go through seventeen walls and kill your neighbor. It is kind of pricey, but if it for self defense and you are worried about the cost, check out the cost of a funeral.
For hunting? I would choose a 6" (minimum) .44 magnum. You can start out shooting .44 Special and get a feel for the gun. I am not a big fan of .357 for hunting. A .44 magnum is a very good deer gun if you are not going to be shooting much more than a hundred yards. But I am biased, and I admit it.
For target shooting, something like a K-38 Masterpiece will fill the bill. This is not exhaustive and is one man's preference. I am sure there will be some dissent from my recommendations and that is fine, I will not claim to have more knowledge than anyone else. These kinds of decisions are personal and what works for me may not work for you.

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from pbshooter1217 wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

The gun would most likely would just be used at the range or behind the house plinking. I'm in college right now so I can't really carry it around with me and it can't really be too expensive. I think a 9mm would be a good caliber for just target shooting.

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from fudge wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

A Glock is a great entry level gun...Things to consider is how if feels in your hands-is it too big, heavy; the price; can you safely handle the weapon-ie recoil...go to a range that rents handguns, try as many as you want or can or afford to try...pick one, whether its a Glock or something else...take a class from a GOOD instructor and do what you want

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