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Q:
Is it safe to use WD-40 for oiling up guns?

from Outdoorsman17 on 08.10.09

Answers (6)

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

WD-40 is actually stands for Water Displacement (Formula #) 40! It was accidently discovered and first primarily used on the Atlas missile program at Vandenberg AFB California. The missile gantries were located right on the Pacific coast close enough you can throw a rock in the ocean. The salty moist air was hell on electronic.

As for a lubricant it’s a fantastic anti rust preventative, but I use regular gun oil for moving parts and for extreme cold arctic weather I used both WD40 and automatic transmission fluid as lubricants using no oil. NO JOKE!

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from Moishe wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

I agree WD 40 is a BAD idea, also do not spray REM-Oil
near the action of your Semi or pump actionit will gum them up, instead spray it on a soft rag to wipe down the OUTSIDE Parts. There is a new Product called
Strike-Hold that does a very good job of CLEANING and a light Lubrication. A cautionary note: It contains Trychlorethelene which is very toxic and you do NOT want to inhale or use in a closed room. I take it outside. Use a white gun lube on moving parts.

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from madmax wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

IF (and that's a big if) that's all you have available, and IF it's going to rain or has been raining, then it might get you by. But, the biggest problem (aside from those mentioned above) is that WD-40 leaves behind a waxy residue after most of it evaporates which gums up small metallic parts quite nicely while also remaining just sticky enough to aid in the collection of dust and grit in and on those parts. Those are also the very same parts you really don't want to have waxy/gummy/dusty/gritty when it comes time for them to move in concert as Ol Betsy tries to punch a primer.

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from Matt wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

Like Yoda and WYOHUNTER said, it does tend to smell and is very dangerous to use on your gun. The best thing to use is gun oil and rifle lube to keep your firearm working.

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from WYOHUNTER wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

As a gunsmith that had that very question posed to me and answered by the same well experienced gunsmith, NO. WD-40 is flamable and your gun is a tool that uses a primer to ignite the powder. Stop and think about this scenario, you have a soon to be fire and a flamable right next to your face as you squeeze the trigger. It is always beter to be safe than to have a regret for not thinking it through.

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from Yoda wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

I wouldn't use it for that, it has a tendency to smell, and it doesn't exactly dry very quickly. I'll stick with hoppes and rem oil

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from Yoda wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

I wouldn't use it for that, it has a tendency to smell, and it doesn't exactly dry very quickly. I'll stick with hoppes and rem oil

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from WYOHUNTER wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

As a gunsmith that had that very question posed to me and answered by the same well experienced gunsmith, NO. WD-40 is flamable and your gun is a tool that uses a primer to ignite the powder. Stop and think about this scenario, you have a soon to be fire and a flamable right next to your face as you squeeze the trigger. It is always beter to be safe than to have a regret for not thinking it through.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from madmax wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

IF (and that's a big if) that's all you have available, and IF it's going to rain or has been raining, then it might get you by. But, the biggest problem (aside from those mentioned above) is that WD-40 leaves behind a waxy residue after most of it evaporates which gums up small metallic parts quite nicely while also remaining just sticky enough to aid in the collection of dust and grit in and on those parts. Those are also the very same parts you really don't want to have waxy/gummy/dusty/gritty when it comes time for them to move in concert as Ol Betsy tries to punch a primer.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Matt wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

Like Yoda and WYOHUNTER said, it does tend to smell and is very dangerous to use on your gun. The best thing to use is gun oil and rifle lube to keep your firearm working.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Moishe wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

I agree WD 40 is a BAD idea, also do not spray REM-Oil
near the action of your Semi or pump actionit will gum them up, instead spray it on a soft rag to wipe down the OUTSIDE Parts. There is a new Product called
Strike-Hold that does a very good job of CLEANING and a light Lubrication. A cautionary note: It contains Trychlorethelene which is very toxic and you do NOT want to inhale or use in a closed room. I take it outside. Use a white gun lube on moving parts.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

WD-40 is actually stands for Water Displacement (Formula #) 40! It was accidently discovered and first primarily used on the Atlas missile program at Vandenberg AFB California. The missile gantries were located right on the Pacific coast close enough you can throw a rock in the ocean. The salty moist air was hell on electronic.

As for a lubricant it’s a fantastic anti rust preventative, but I use regular gun oil for moving parts and for extreme cold arctic weather I used both WD40 and automatic transmission fluid as lubricants using no oil. NO JOKE!

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer (200 characters or less)

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