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Q:
How old must a spotted fawn be so it can survive without its mother? I'm asking this to weather or not to allow the taking of does during the early season on my land.My season opens Oct.1 and every doe I have seen has had spoted fawns with them some still have spotted fawns as late as Jan.28.Should I still allow the taking of them or not.For now and the past 5 years I have not allowed the taking of does that have spotted fawns .

from Engineer1 on 10.14.09

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from Engineer1 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Thank you for the replies I am happy to know that there are other sportsmen out there that fell the same and like to share their intrest.I am gonna stick to my rules and not let anybody shoot does that are known to have fawns with them no matter how many friends get mad at me.I feel that fawn might be a trophy in 4 to 5 years if allowed to live with its mother.

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from sniperpro wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

from what i have seen via trail camera the doe fawns stay with there mother until late winter-early spring(March-April). bucks seem to leave when winter starts or a little into winter (Novmber-December).

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from Johnnie wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

I would have to say for the first year of the fawn's life. The doe teaches it young the ways of life and survival. That fawn might just grow up to be that monster buck hunters dream of.
My hunting buddy and I always had the rule of fawn and doe together they are off limits. I like your idea of doe and fawn to be left alone. I would like to hunt your land, because you have a sound idea. And way before the 'right thing to do' came about, we wouldn't take button or spiked antlered bucks; we looked for 'mature' bucks. Does that definitely didn't have fawns were fair game. Didn't always get a buck; but we didn't care, we enjoy being in the woods which we often called 'church'. We are meat hunters and if that trophy buck came along, well that much better.

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from Johnnie wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

I would have to say for the first year of the fawn's life. The doe teaches it young the ways of life and survival. That fawn might just grow up to be that monster buck hunters dream of.
My hunting buddy and I always had the rule of fawn and doe together they are off limits. I like your idea of doe and fawn to be left alone. I would like to hunt your land, because you have a sound idea. And way before the 'right thing to do' came about, we wouldn't take button or spiked antlered bucks; we looked for 'mature' bucks. Does that definitely didn't have fawns were fair game. Didn't always get a buck; but we didn't care, we enjoy being in the woods which we often called 'church'. We are meat hunters and if that trophy buck came along, well that much better.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from sniperpro wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

from what i have seen via trail camera the doe fawns stay with there mother until late winter-early spring(March-April). bucks seem to leave when winter starts or a little into winter (Novmber-December).

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Engineer1 wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Thank you for the replies I am happy to know that there are other sportsmen out there that fell the same and like to share their intrest.I am gonna stick to my rules and not let anybody shoot does that are known to have fawns with them no matter how many friends get mad at me.I feel that fawn might be a trophy in 4 to 5 years if allowed to live with its mother.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer (200 characters or less)