Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Recent Posts

Categories

Recent Comments

Archives

  • June 29, 2012

    Survival Skills: How To Make A Key Ring Trap Trigger-1

    by

    A key chain ring is one of those everyday items that never gets much attention. It holds our keys together, and that’s all it does for us, most of the time.

    But as I focus more on EDC (every day carry) gear lately, I wanted every part of my keychain to help with survival chores, even the key ring. So I thought you might get a kick out of my favorite key ring trap trigger. Here's how it works.

    [ Read Full Post ]
  • June 27, 2012

    Survival Skills: Find Your Way With A Sun Compass-2

    by

    People often ask me how I can tell so quickly which way is north, south, east or west. Well, the straight answer is that I just pay attention to the orientation of things wherever I go, and I also pay attention to the time of day and the position of the sun. But what happens if you have no compass or GPS, you weren’t paying attention, and it’s the middle of the day so you cannot use sunrise or sunset to gain your bearings?

    Never fear, the sun moves enough at midday that we can find our direction by sticking a few twigs in the ground to make a sun compass.

    [ Read Full Post ]
  • June 25, 2012

    10 Survival Tricks For A Lexan Water Bottle-2

    by

    The ability to store and transport water is a huge part of any good survival strategy, especially in a dry climate. But that heavy duty Lexan plastic bottle is more than just a one-trick pony. Lexan plastic is shatter-resistant and can withstand boiling temperatures. Here are ten other survival chores that your water bottle can perform beyond just holding your drinking water.

    1. Waterproof Survival Kit: Since a water bottle won’t let water out, it also won’t let water inside (unless it sinks to a depth that has high enough pressure to cause the lid to leak). Stuff a water bottle with survival equipment to keep the gear dry and in one place. If it’s brightly colored, it’ll be easier to find. If you don’t overload the bottle, it can even float.

    [ Read Full Post ]
  • June 22, 2012

    Survival Skills: How to Make a Digging Stick-0

    by

    So what happens when you need to dig, but you don’t have a shovel, spade or pick?

    You can do what people have done for thousands of years. You can make a digging stick.

    Making these sticks certainly isn't rocket science, but some ways are better than others. First, you’ll usually want to go with hardwood, as it’s the most durable type of wood. Oak, hickory, elm, maple, osage and locust are all great choices.

    [ Read Full Post ]
  • June 20, 2012

    Survival Skills: Build The Perfect Camp Fireplace-5

    by

    If you had the time and materials to construct the perfect wilderness camp fireplace, what would it look like? This depends a lot on the materials you have to work with. But with a few carefully chosen stones, a shovel and some dirt – you can make my favorite style of fireplace, which I think our ancestors would be proud to see. 

    [ Read Full Post ]

  • June 18, 2012

    Survival Skills: How To Make a Bark Container-0

    by

    Did you ever notice how easy it is to knock off a chunk of tree bark in the late spring time? That phenomenon is due to the sap running in the tree and the bark temporarily loosening as the tree gets ready to put down another growth ring. This is the perfect time to peel bark for containers.

    Bark containers have been used for thousands of years and are found worldwide. From the birch bark canoes and maple syrup buckets of the Native Americans in the North East, to Aboriginal bark cooking pots in Australia, the containers have been as diverse as the people who have made them.

    Bark containers also give you a strong and versatile container to use for survival purposes in the wilderness, especially if your normal gear has been lost or stolen. Here’s how to make one type of bark container.

    [ Read Full Post ]
  • June 14, 2012

    Survival Skills: Build a Perimeter Alarm for Your Camp -3

    by

    Ever wake in the morning while in the wild and wonder if man or beast has wandered into your camp late at night while you slept?

    With a simple alarm system, you may be able to rest a little easier.

    You won’t find the professional version of this contraption at your local sporting goods store, but if you travel the far north, you’ll find places that sell trip wire flares. These flares are used in remote camps to warn of polar bear and grizzly bear incursions.

    [ Read Full Post ]
  • June 11, 2012

    Survival Book Review: Build The Perfect Bug Out Bag-2

    by

    Survival school owner, instructor and author Creek Stewart couldn’t have picked a better time to release his new book, Build The Perfect Bug Out Bag. With all the baggage that the year 2012 has attached to it, lots of people are nervous about the future. Naturally, I couldn’t wait to get this book and give it a thorough read.

    I wanted to see if it met my three criteria for a good survival book. I wanted to find out if it was realistic, if it contained legitimate skills and if it would be helpful to people.

    [ Read Full Post ]
  • June 11, 2012

    Does a Solar Oven Really Work?-1

    by

    The concept of a solar oven seems reasonable enough; and I think we have all seen the results of this form of heat collection. Remember the last time you left a drink or a candy bar in your vehicle on a hot, sunny day? The soda became scalding hot and your Snickers bar turned into a chocolate and peanut milkshake.

    The reason for this transformation is simple: If we combine a contained airspace (like a vehicle) and a radiant heat source (like the sun) then we can reach temperatures that will slow-cook food and even pasteurize water. This simple technology has been around for many years. There are even some non-profit organizations that build and distribute small solar ovens to the people of poorer countries to improve these people’s safety and quality of life.

    [ Read Full Post ]
  • June 7, 2012

    Survival Manual: Be Aware of Your Surroundings-1

    by

    Many people walk around with their heads stuck where the sun never shines, missing critical signs that can impact their well-being. The most basic urban survival skill is making sure you’re not one of those people. Situational awareness is key to getting out of tricky scenarios—or, better yet, avoiding them entirely.

    [ Read Full Post ]
Page 1 of 212next ›last »
bmxbiz