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Bond's Biometric Gun: Dumb, Dangerous, and Plausible

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November 21, 2012
Bond's Biometric Gun: Dumb, Dangerous, and Plausible - 3

Bond, James Bond.
               
Unless you are Bond, James Bond, the biometric Walther PPK/S carried by 007 in 'Skyfall' won't work for you.
               
Zany gizmos are Bond movie trademarks. However, according to Dave Guston and Ed Finn of Slate.com, the technology to biometrically personalize all firearms -- as in 'Skyfall' -- "is technically plausible" now.
               
Guston and Finn say it would be relatively simple to install biometric palm scanners on firearms to lock out unauthorized users. The only thing restraining the inexorable advance of such invasive and potentially exploitative technologies is “politics,” they lament.
               
"Remember, kids: Guns don’t kill ideas -- pessimists do," they write.
               
Rational adults do, too -- especially dumb and dangerous ideas thoughtlessly espoused with "giddy fanboy fervor," writes Gun Rights Examiner David Codrea in a Nov. 17 column.
               
Dumb idea, he says, because such gadgets would create performance complications and eventually outlaw 270 million existing firearms without them.
               
Dangerous idea, he says, because New Jersey and Maryland have already encoded "personalized firearm provisions in their laws in anticipation of the technology becoming developed enough to mandate."
               
For more, go to:             
-- Biometric 'Skyfall' gun neither new nor 'smart'
               
-- The Man With the Personalized Gun
               
-- Skyfall: Someone should make James Bond’s biometric Walther PPK/S gun. – Slate Magazine
               
-- Learn the Science Behind Bond’s ‘Skyfall’ Weapon
               
-- Finally, a Bond Movie With a Weapon We Actually Should Make

Comments (3)

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from huntfishtrap wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

Sounds kind of dumb to me.

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from jcarlin wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

I really do need an editor. Is Bonnier hiring thoughtless idiots who can't put two consecutive sentences together which don't require correction?

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from jcarlin wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

Forget all of that. It's just one more thing to go wrong. Has a battery, depends on software, and unproven scanners. Maybe this is fine at a security gate with constant maintenance and a back-up security team to run your info if you don't scan properly. I don't have a back-up security team, so I need my gun to go "bang" on demand".
I have a Taurus 605 that has the internal security lock. Littly manual hex type key that locks or unlocks the action. I don't even konw where the key is these days (which is one possible complication). But I stopped using it to do unreliability. It always locked, and it was no problem checking that in an unloaded revolver (but not depending on it). However, on multiple occassions I unlocked it to full stop when it was relatively new, and then gun failed to fire as the lock hadn't actually disengaged.
That is completely and totally unacceptable.
BTW did anyone who saw the movie notice that when the palm lock came into play it allowed the unauthorized user to repeatedly pull trigger and acted as any normal double action and the hammer fell. Was the lock basically engaging a strike plate safety that just prevented a strike on primer? I was wondering if Walthers are typically DA/SA.

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from jcarlin wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

Forget all of that. It's just one more thing to go wrong. Has a battery, depends on software, and unproven scanners. Maybe this is fine at a security gate with constant maintenance and a back-up security team to run your info if you don't scan properly. I don't have a back-up security team, so I need my gun to go "bang" on demand".
I have a Taurus 605 that has the internal security lock. Littly manual hex type key that locks or unlocks the action. I don't even konw where the key is these days (which is one possible complication). But I stopped using it to do unreliability. It always locked, and it was no problem checking that in an unloaded revolver (but not depending on it). However, on multiple occassions I unlocked it to full stop when it was relatively new, and then gun failed to fire as the lock hadn't actually disengaged.
That is completely and totally unacceptable.
BTW did anyone who saw the movie notice that when the palm lock came into play it allowed the unauthorized user to repeatedly pull trigger and acted as any normal double action and the hammer fell. Was the lock basically engaging a strike plate safety that just prevented a strike on primer? I was wondering if Walthers are typically DA/SA.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jcarlin wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

I really do need an editor. Is Bonnier hiring thoughtless idiots who can't put two consecutive sentences together which don't require correction?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntfishtrap wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

Sounds kind of dumb to me.

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