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Ask African Officials Your Hunting Questions

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May 22, 2013
Ask African Officials Your Hunting Questions - 5

Here’s your chance to ask anything you want of high-level African hunting officials. Outdoor Life Editor Andrew McKean has arranged an interview with Namibia’s Secretary of State, Netumbo Nandi-Ndaitwah next month in Namibia.

Nandi-Ndaitwah was previously the country’s Minister of Environment and Tourism and during her term in that office she promoted the concept of selective and ethical hunting as the primary wildlife management tool in the southwestern Africa nation.

Also participating in the interview, which will take place in Windhoek next month, is the country’s incoming Minister of Environment and Tourism, Uahekua Herunga.

Outdoor Life would like to deliver questions from its readers to these influential leaders. Please submit your question below. We may edit them for brevity and clarity, but we’ll post the entire Q-and-A on outdoorlife.com later this summer.

Comments (5)

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from crazy canuck wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

A few questions I would be interested in you asking are: How has leopard hunting improved/worsened since the moratorium a couple of years ago? Have the success rates been similar to before? Do you believe the ban on use of dogs was helpful, harmful, or has made little difference to both hunter success and leopard populations? Has the problem of quota being used a year or more in advance been quelled since the moratorium?

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from crazy canuck wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

In regards to schmakenzie's question, asking that percentage for all of Africa is simply too broad. Many countries do not have any high fence hunting at all. With well over a dozen nations that allow hunting and on a continent that has a surface area 25% larger than the entirety of North America the question needs refinement. Only the southern African countries have fenced "hunting" (South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Zambia) and perhaps a tiny amount of operators in the rest of the countries. Some high fence areas are huge and are identical to a fair chase situation due to the animals natural home range size. Others are the size of a backyard and are like going hunting at your nearest zoo.

South Africa is virtually all high fence, although some operators conduct hunts on excellent low fence (cattle fence/barbed wire) or entirely open areas. Eventually you are going to bump into a fence though.

Zimbabwe and Zambia have there fair share of high fence outfits but they have many more wilderness areas.

Namibia is a great destination and has plenty of free range areas and plenty of high fence areas. As with RSA, some are big, some are ludicrously small.

The majority of African safaris are conducted in southern Africa and a fair number of them are on high fence properties. A number of reasons attribute to this including pricing, trip duration, and accessibility. Comparing a 21 day full bag safari in Tanzania or Ethiopia or Cameroon is not comparable to hunter numbers and high fences in southern Africa. That would be similar to a comparison of a moose/bear hunt in Alaska to whitetail hunting on the back 40 down in Georgia.

I think the question should be limited to Namibia as the folks Andrew has a chance to talk with mostly know about there and many facts about other countries will simply be guesses at best. I didn't mean to rant off but asking questions about Africa to Namibian officials is far too broad a topic and many North Americans don't fully realize the scope of Africa.

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from trudeau wrote 47 weeks 1 day ago

How much estimated meat is donated to the villages by hunters in their area?
Seth

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from HuntingEditor wrote 47 weeks 1 day ago

Excellent question, schmakenzie - I'll ask it.

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from schmakenzie wrote 47 weeks 2 days ago

What's the percentage of hunts in Africa that are fair chase? To be specific, regardless of the acreage, what's the percentage of hunts in Africa that don't entail a high fence?

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from schmakenzie wrote 47 weeks 2 days ago

What's the percentage of hunts in Africa that are fair chase? To be specific, regardless of the acreage, what's the percentage of hunts in Africa that don't entail a high fence?

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from HuntingEditor wrote 47 weeks 1 day ago

Excellent question, schmakenzie - I'll ask it.

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from trudeau wrote 47 weeks 1 day ago

How much estimated meat is donated to the villages by hunters in their area?
Seth

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from crazy canuck wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

In regards to schmakenzie's question, asking that percentage for all of Africa is simply too broad. Many countries do not have any high fence hunting at all. With well over a dozen nations that allow hunting and on a continent that has a surface area 25% larger than the entirety of North America the question needs refinement. Only the southern African countries have fenced "hunting" (South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Zambia) and perhaps a tiny amount of operators in the rest of the countries. Some high fence areas are huge and are identical to a fair chase situation due to the animals natural home range size. Others are the size of a backyard and are like going hunting at your nearest zoo.

South Africa is virtually all high fence, although some operators conduct hunts on excellent low fence (cattle fence/barbed wire) or entirely open areas. Eventually you are going to bump into a fence though.

Zimbabwe and Zambia have there fair share of high fence outfits but they have many more wilderness areas.

Namibia is a great destination and has plenty of free range areas and plenty of high fence areas. As with RSA, some are big, some are ludicrously small.

The majority of African safaris are conducted in southern Africa and a fair number of them are on high fence properties. A number of reasons attribute to this including pricing, trip duration, and accessibility. Comparing a 21 day full bag safari in Tanzania or Ethiopia or Cameroon is not comparable to hunter numbers and high fences in southern Africa. That would be similar to a comparison of a moose/bear hunt in Alaska to whitetail hunting on the back 40 down in Georgia.

I think the question should be limited to Namibia as the folks Andrew has a chance to talk with mostly know about there and many facts about other countries will simply be guesses at best. I didn't mean to rant off but asking questions about Africa to Namibian officials is far too broad a topic and many North Americans don't fully realize the scope of Africa.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from crazy canuck wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

A few questions I would be interested in you asking are: How has leopard hunting improved/worsened since the moratorium a couple of years ago? Have the success rates been similar to before? Do you believe the ban on use of dogs was helpful, harmful, or has made little difference to both hunter success and leopard populations? Has the problem of quota being used a year or more in advance been quelled since the moratorium?

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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