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Best New Knives: Cutting-Edge Blades from SHOT Show 2014

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February 03, 2014
Best New Knives: Cutting-Edge Blades from SHOT Show 2014 - 7

The 2014 SHOT Show offered something for every outdoor enthusiast on the planet. Take for example the new knives and cutting instruments unveiled in Vegas. While many were tailored to anglers and hunters, others addressed the needs of survivalists, and still others whetted the appetites of law enforcement and military professionals. Regardless of the need, these cutting edge blades are sure to fit the bill.

Buck 110 Folding Hunter

This year Buck Knives celebrates the 50th anniversary of the 110 Folding Hunter, available in a plain or finger-grooved Macassar Ebony Dymondwood handle. First introduced by Al Buck in 1964, today it is one of the most imitated and recognizable knives on the market.

“I remember when my Dad was designing the 110," said Chuck Buck, chairman of Buck Knives. "He wanted a folding knife that would be reliable and contain the features he felt were important for a good knife. He always believed in doing things right in order to succeed."

MSRP: $73; buckknives.com

Buck Splizzors

Buck’s new multi-function Splizzors conveniently combine the versatility of scissors and pliers to create a handy tool designed for any fishing task. The Splizzors utilize edge-to-edge pressure 10 times that of normal scissors and contain micro-serrations to cut braided and high-performance fishing line with ease. This unique design allows for efficient cutting, trimming, shearing, bending, crimping and hook removal, all with one exceptional tool. And like all Buck products, it's backed by the company's famous Forever Warranty.

MSRP: $100; buckknives.com 

Ka-Bar KBD Master Series

The KBD Master Series from Ka-Bar Knives is a set of cutters designed by custom knife-maker Mike Snody. Both the Snody Boss and Big Boss (pictured) are made with S35v stainless steel and come with high-grade, heavyweight JRE sheaths that feature grommet holes for lashing in any carry configuration. The Snody Boss has an overall length of 6 9/16 inches (blade is 3 ½ inches), while the Big Boss measures 9 inches (blade is 4 9/16 inches).

MSRP: Snoddy Boss - $157.99; Snoddy Big Boss - $217.54; ka-bar.com 

Ka-Bar TDI/Hinderer Collection

Also new from Ka-Bar is the TDI/Hinderer Collection, a series of design collaborations between Tactical Defense Institute President and Chief Instructor John Benner and custom knife-maker Rick Hinderer. Based on their combined experiences as a veteran police lieutenant and firefighter/EMT, Benner and Hinderer have designed the knives for real-life emergency situations. Each one is sure when gripped and ambidextrous for a multitude of application options. The Hellfire (top) has a hawksbill blade, while the Hinderance uses a Wharncliffe blade. Both come with a locking sheath.

MSRP: Hinderance and Hellfire - $111.56; ka-bar.com

Helle Norway Eggen

Since 1932, Helle, Norway has been making quality Scandinavian-style knives (no finger guards) from Old World materials. Today automated production and vast batches are common for knife manufacturers around the world. Not so with the small, Norway-based company: the production of a single Helle knife can take up to 45 manual steps. The craftsmanship and attention to detail of a Helle knife can be seen in the Eggen, which uses a Gunnar Lothe design, triple-laminated proprietary stainless steel and a curly birch handle. Like all Helle knives, the Eggen comes with a genuine leather sheath made by the same employees for over 50 years.

MSRP: $119; helle.no

Helle Viking

Ever wonder what kind of knife Nordic explorers used? Well wonder no more, because Helle is also introducing the Viking, a knife that looks like it came right out of the Middle Ages. The Viking comes with a triple-laminated carbon steel blade and a curly birch handle.

MSRP: $114; helle.no

Katz UK-CW

In 2014, Katz Knives is adding to its popular Lion King Series with the K300-UK-CW Yukon. Like each cutting instrument in the series, the K300-UK-CW boasts a full-tang, 5-millimeter XT-80 stainless steel blade, a flared butt for greater control and balance, and full 2-inch jimping (cutmarks) for finger and thumb support. The UK-CW is made with a cherry-wood handle and weighs a mere 11 oz.

Retail price (MSRP not provided): $195; katzknives.com

DPx H*I*T Cutter

Designed by adventurer Robert Young Pelton, the DPx (Dangerous Places Extreme) H*I*T Cutter uses the patented DPx Centric mechanism; an integrated pivoting handle and blade guard. This stellar fixed blade knife has an S35VN steel blade with multiple hex cutouts and a carabineer clip for attaching to gear. The H*I*T® Cutter measures 5 ½ inches (blade is 2 inches) and weighs just 2.88 oz. Best of all, it’s made in the U.S.A. by White River Knife & Tool (Grand Rapids, Mich.).

MSRP: $187.50; dpxgear.com

Timberline Machete Survival System

The Dave Young Design Tactical Combat Series Machete Survival System from Timberline is a survival tool that's just as useful to the hunter as it is to the jungle explorer. The spine of the Machete boasts serrations in the top for shredding and ripping vines, while serrations in the bottom can be used for precise surgical cutting. The tool also includes a saw portion for hacking in limited space, a wire cutter, a wire splicer and a bottom that acts as a close lever impact piece (CLIP), enabling the user to easily break glass or mark rock. The Machete comes with a sheath and handy sharpener.

MSRP: $150; (800) LIV-SHARP

Bear & Sons Cutlery Blue Jeans Series

For nearly 150 years, blue jeans have been worn and enjoyed by the whole family. Honoring that tradition, Bear & Sons Cutlery is introducing 10-knife Blue Jeans Series for 2014. All 10 folders have rugged blue G10 handles, an embedded back pocket B&S shield, and polished high carbon stainless steel blades. The series comes in three traditional favorites, two farmhand models and five locking models, including the 3 7/8-inch Cowhand (pictured). Like all Bear & Son knives, the Blue Jeans Series is made in the U.S.A. and backed by Bear’s lifetime warranty.  

MSRP: $44 - $118; bearandsoncutlery

Case Lockback Whittler

Craftsman Tony Bose fashioned his first knife in 1972 out of a hack saw blade he received from a friend. Today he collaborates with W.R. Case & Sons Cutlery Co. to create custom knives that are so treasured that they’ve passed on from one generation to another.

“I don’t so much design knives as I bring old designs back from the grave,” explained Bose.

Case in point: the Lockback Whittler, which is a revamped cutter first manufactured during World War I. The Whittler is fitted with a wire cut Wharncliffe blade, Pen blade and Coping Blade. It’s also made with steel bolsters, a pinned-on shield and specially milled steel liners for improved blade action. 

MSRP not available; wrcase.com

Mantis Knives Civilianaire

Need a small knife that can make precision cuts? Then look no further than the Civilianaire Coin Knife collection from Mantis® Knives. At just 1 ½ inches in diameter, each of the four designs easily fits in the coin pocket of your favorite pair of jeans. The Demon (bottom) and Angel use stainless Damascus, while the Monarch and Heiress (top) use polished 420 stainless. Each Civilianaire is the perfect 5th pocket knife that cuts like a knife twice its size.

MSRP: $40 - $80; mantisknives.com

Gerber Legend

Born of cutting-edge materials and crafted with decades of design experience, the Gerber Legend is a USA-made knife that will provide a lifetime of service to hunters. Built to last using premium CPM-S35VN stainless steel and a full tang construction, the Legend features a 3-D machined G-10 handle with Oregon spalted maple inlay for a superior grip. A limited edition offering, the Legend includes a handmade Tanner Goods sheath.

MSRP: $750.00; gerbergear.com

Gerber Tactical Folding Knives

Also new from Gerber are three tactical folding knives: the Order (pictured), Edict, and Decree. The Order features a 420HC blade and a glass-filled nylon handle that’s over-molded to provide a secure grip for soldier and police officers for cutting, prying, digging and fighting.

MSRP: $44.95; gerbergear.com

Ruko HYDRA-X

The new HYDRA-X outdoor adventure set by Ruko provides everything you need for fishing and hunting in a simple to use lockback mechanism, allowing you to change blades in seconds. Four blade patterns are available, including the 4-inch clip point, 4 ½-inch gut hook, 6 ½-inch boning/filet and the 6 ½-inch wood saw. Each blade uses razor sharp 7Cr17MoV stainless steel for strength and durability, while a blaze orange EDM finish GFR nylon handle makes it the cutting system hard to lose when in the field. Includes a magnesium ferrite fire started and Safe-Sharp® carbide blade/ceramic rod sharpener, and even an emergency whistle. All of this comes packaged in a handle nylon WX-3D® camouflage cases with zippered storage pockets.

MSRP: $99; rukoproducts.com

Silver Stag Knives

Silver Stag has teamed up with Sturm, Ruger & Co. and “Mr. Whitetail” Larry Weishuhn to offer three new knives designed for a variety of field and backwoods applications. Each one is made with high carbon D2 steel and a handle made from genuine antler. The Big Game Cutter has 4-inch blade and elk antler handle, while the Backwoods Pro has a 3-inch blade whitetail antler handle. Also available is the Folder, which has a 4-inch blade is real caribou antler handle. All knives come with a quality leather sheath.

MSRP: Big Game Cutter - $129 (top); Backwoods Pro - $125 (middle); Folder - $140; silverstag.com

Real Avid Hogzilla

So you’re gonna go out and take on a few hundred pounds of cranky, fighting fury that boasts razor sharp tusks, a tough as nails hide and a mind crazier a marsh hare? Then you need the Hogzilla from Real Avid. The Hogzilla is a serious, close quarters knife that’s nastier than a wild pig rooting up a clover patch. It’s designed to make even the nastiest cutting jobs quick, easy and over in a hurry. It’s the only sticker to have when a serious case of “boardom” sets in, and when use it, you’ll be happier than a pig in ... well, you know.

MSRP: $34.99; realavid.com

Comments (7)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Morgan Atwood wrote 22 weeks 5 days ago

It's quite obvious that what the author of this blurb knows about knives could be printed on a postage stamp, with room left over.
There are several designs here that are:
Not New.
Use Very Poor Materials and/or Poor Construction.
Are Poorly Designed.

Now, to be fair, some of the knives shown are well made, and well designed. The Helle knives, the DPX, the KaBar Hinderer's, in particular. But, are they the best knives?
The Helle have been around for awhile. The Hinderer TDI's are excellent knives, but I get the impression the author couldn't really explain to any of us why they are (he certainly cannot use the proper names for the blade-styles, as that is not a hawksbill blade). The DPX is pretty cool, and functional, and well made, and new, and may be the only one that really belongs on this list.
There were many truly new and innovative knives at SHOT. The Buck 110 is not one of them. Neither is the overpriced Gerber special edition (especially not when those materials, and construction style, can be had far far cheaper), or the Gerber folders with the abominably poor steel, 420.
And then there is that HogZilla.... thing. Any serious boar hunter should be laughing at the design of that, as should any serious outdoorsman. The blade shape is going to be incredibly poor for penetration, and for utility cutting, as it has no refined point and no belly. The construction appears to be very poor; A style that's been around since the 1980's in many other low end knives, which is very fragile. And the price does nothing to suggest this one will be any different.

Really, Outdoor Life... You can do better. Find a writer who really knows knives, and get them to blurb the blades of SHOT Show.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntfishtrap wrote 22 weeks 6 days ago

Knives are the most overpriced piece of outdoor equipment out there. Of course you do get what you pay for to some degree, and I'm sure these high-priced babies are good blades, but you don't have to spend a lot of money to get a good knife. My standard sheath knife for boning out/cutting up game consists of a Camillius blade that I bought from a knife-makers supply company for less than $10, and a deer antler handle I added myself. It is a phenomenal knife - takes an edge like a straight razor, and holds it for hours of cutting. Obviously not everyone can or wants to make their own knife; this is just an example that you don't have to spend a lot to get a lot.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from John3006 wrote 23 weeks 20 hours ago

Shrade Old Timer has a really nice blade changer kit similar to the one shown by Roko, with a small capping blade instead of a fillet blade and less the sharpener and fire starter for less than $50.00, which I purchased for Christmas.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John3006 wrote 23 weeks 20 hours ago

Shrade Old Timer has a really nice blade changer kit similar to the one shown by Roko, with a small capping blade instead of a fillet blade and less the sharpener and fire starter for less than $50.00, which I purchased for Christmas.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from officerdom1987 wrote 23 weeks 1 day ago

Why are these the best new knives yet the cheapest is $73.00 for a pen knife? Where is the sharp and strong knife for the 'common man' hunter? I'll take my $45.00 Swiss Army Knife over a $750.00 knife any day of the week. I'd be scared to carry a knife that much! OL needs to once again show us items that we NEED rather than like and look pretty.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Geoffrey Bourre wrote 23 weeks 1 day ago

Helle Viking? new?

Helle, I've had one for 20 years.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Blue Ox wrote 23 weeks 1 day ago

Very nice & varied selection this time around.
I am impressed. Now i need to run out & find that lockback whittler..

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)

from Blue Ox wrote 23 weeks 1 day ago

Very nice & varied selection this time around.
I am impressed. Now i need to run out & find that lockback whittler..

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Geoffrey Bourre wrote 23 weeks 1 day ago

Helle Viking? new?

Helle, I've had one for 20 years.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from officerdom1987 wrote 23 weeks 1 day ago

Why are these the best new knives yet the cheapest is $73.00 for a pen knife? Where is the sharp and strong knife for the 'common man' hunter? I'll take my $45.00 Swiss Army Knife over a $750.00 knife any day of the week. I'd be scared to carry a knife that much! OL needs to once again show us items that we NEED rather than like and look pretty.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from John3006 wrote 23 weeks 20 hours ago

Shrade Old Timer has a really nice blade changer kit similar to the one shown by Roko, with a small capping blade instead of a fillet blade and less the sharpener and fire starter for less than $50.00, which I purchased for Christmas.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John3006 wrote 23 weeks 20 hours ago

Shrade Old Timer has a really nice blade changer kit similar to the one shown by Roko, with a small capping blade instead of a fillet blade and less the sharpener and fire starter for less than $50.00, which I purchased for Christmas.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Morgan Atwood wrote 22 weeks 5 days ago

It's quite obvious that what the author of this blurb knows about knives could be printed on a postage stamp, with room left over.
There are several designs here that are:
Not New.
Use Very Poor Materials and/or Poor Construction.
Are Poorly Designed.

Now, to be fair, some of the knives shown are well made, and well designed. The Helle knives, the DPX, the KaBar Hinderer's, in particular. But, are they the best knives?
The Helle have been around for awhile. The Hinderer TDI's are excellent knives, but I get the impression the author couldn't really explain to any of us why they are (he certainly cannot use the proper names for the blade-styles, as that is not a hawksbill blade). The DPX is pretty cool, and functional, and well made, and new, and may be the only one that really belongs on this list.
There were many truly new and innovative knives at SHOT. The Buck 110 is not one of them. Neither is the overpriced Gerber special edition (especially not when those materials, and construction style, can be had far far cheaper), or the Gerber folders with the abominably poor steel, 420.
And then there is that HogZilla.... thing. Any serious boar hunter should be laughing at the design of that, as should any serious outdoorsman. The blade shape is going to be incredibly poor for penetration, and for utility cutting, as it has no refined point and no belly. The construction appears to be very poor; A style that's been around since the 1980's in many other low end knives, which is very fragile. And the price does nothing to suggest this one will be any different.

Really, Outdoor Life... You can do better. Find a writer who really knows knives, and get them to blurb the blades of SHOT Show.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntfishtrap wrote 22 weeks 6 days ago

Knives are the most overpriced piece of outdoor equipment out there. Of course you do get what you pay for to some degree, and I'm sure these high-priced babies are good blades, but you don't have to spend a lot of money to get a good knife. My standard sheath knife for boning out/cutting up game consists of a Camillius blade that I bought from a knife-makers supply company for less than $10, and a deer antler handle I added myself. It is a phenomenal knife - takes an edge like a straight razor, and holds it for hours of cutting. Obviously not everyone can or wants to make their own knife; this is just an example that you don't have to spend a lot to get a lot.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)

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