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Killer Cats: New Study Shows Cats are Threat to Wildlife

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January 30, 2013
Killer Cats: New Study Shows Cats are Threat to Wildlife - 30

My grandma’s cat, Mitzi, was fairly pleasant as cats go—or at least she seemed that way during the daytime. What she did at night was another matter entirely. She was a stone-cold killer and a damn good one judging by the daily deposits of critter parts—her trophies—she’d leave on the doorstep each day. Hell, I never realized that our cottontail rabbit population was that high.

A new study just published in the journal Nature Communications, quantifies what we outdoorsmen who have been paying attention have known for years. Cats, especially feral ones, are a huge threat to wildlife. Biologist, in fact, estimate that each year, felines kill as many as 3.7 million birds and 20.7 billion smaller critters such as mice and chipmunks. Now, I’m pretty much okay with the mice and chipmunks, but am decidedly not comfortable with the rabbit slaughter—at all. Further, a University of Georgia study, which included attaching video cameras to 60 cats, found that one-third of a typical cat’s day is spent killing stuff.

Murderous cats are apparently a huge problem in New Zealand as well, where environmentalist Gareth Morgan has called for mandatory country-wide cat registration. Now there’s an idea! Hell, if I need to register my gun, you should need to register your damn cat.

Comments (30)

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from DaBears wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

Feral cats are coyote chocolate. As much as I hate to admit it, "what is a coyote" is the perfect answer to Feral cats for $500 Alex.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Laume702 wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

I can't believe you actually printed this article. This has liberal overtones all over it. Without cats the Earth would be over run with unwanted pests from insects to the unwanted mammal variety. My dog and cat actually hunted together. My Mom and Dad were over run with gophers. SO I took my dog down to their house for a visit and the dog cleaned up the gopher population within two weeks.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ILikePike wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

I live in Wisconsin. Tonight, when the old lady got home from work, I had left the door open in the breezeway that goes to the garage. The garage door was also open so she could drive in easily. She came home, went into the breezeway and closed the door. She was startled as a cat was trying to jump threw a window in the breezeway, that was not our cat. I think the cat was eating some old food our cat would not eat, and it was frozen in the dish, but now it is eaten. But anyway, could I have legally took my shotgun and blow the cat in half? It was an animal that was in my household, but not my cat. And it did scare the hell outa the old lady.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

lovesoutdoors,

I am making a lot of assumptions on the situation. I would do nothing. Chances are if the dogs are well groomed and the deer is healthy, the deer will out run the dogs in the end. I have dogs come through my hunting areas time to time while I am deer hunting. It sucks, sometimes ruins the hunt. My feeling angry is more towards the owner of the dog than the dog. The dog doesn't know any better he is just a dog being a dog, but the owner knows better. I have never experienced this kind of situation over and over. If I did I would call a rescue organization. Rescue organizations are willing and able to take care of these situations for free and are very skillfull at what they do.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

lovesoutdoors,

I am making a lot of assumptions on the situation. I would do nothing. Chances are if the dogs are well groomed and the deer is healthy, the deer will out run the dogs in the end. I have dogs come through my hunting areas time to time while I am deer hunting. It sucks, sometimes ruins the hunt. My feeling angry is more towards the owner of the dog than the dog. The dog doesn't know any better he is just a dog being a dog, but the owner knows better. I have never experienced this kind of situation over and over. If I did I would call a rescue organization. Rescue organizations are willing and able to take care of these situations for free and are very skillfull at what they do.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from LovesOutdoors wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

schmakenize,
You said your a hunter. This happen to me while I was out hunting a few years ago.
If you were in the woods hunting, and you saw three well groomed dogs wearing collars chasing a deer, and the larger dog was biting at the deer's back leg. What would you do? Open your Wisconsin law book, call the game warden, call 911, give the dogs a milk bone or would you shoot the dogs?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from LovesOutdoors wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

I posted a trail camera photo on this Outdoor Life website titled "Stalked By A Predator". The photo showed a cat stalking two turkey hens. The motion camera click at the perfect time. Outdoor Life has the photo listed on the best photos of 2012.
A house cat sleeps in a warm house, gets a nice meal and goes outside to kill small game, song birds and other wildlife, that are trying to survive the elements.
Cat owners are stupid to let that cat out to kill or be killed by bigger animals, birds of prey, Rabies and Lyme disease.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

@schmakenzie,
Challenge accepted. I tend to learn/benefit more when someone presents a different opinion on a situation.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

MNwhitetailhunter, I am a hunter also. I love the heat, it's fun for me and I learn a lot from other people. I do feel I am right and have proved it several times. Some people agree with me as you have seen and others have not, that's ok. We don't have to agree on everything. What fun would that be? There is a lot of gray areas when it comes to cats in the wild and debating like this gives perspectives. Sometimes I am wrong on here and I have learned that. I try to keep it civil, but I do get negatives sometimes. I love outdoor life and look forward to the blogs and debates.

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from MNwhitetailHunter wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

this argument has turned into a bitc*n match. Really, the only thing that is being fought over is someone who thinks they are right. nothing said here is going to change any ones beliefs. i think its a waste of time trying to tell someone what they can and cant do/believe. And no offense schmakenzie, but you do know that you are commenting on a website that most people believe in pro hunting/human rights and as the saying goes, if you cant take the heat, get out of the kitchen.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

I think Charlie already provided a situation for when it is legal to kill a FERAL cat in WI...plus my most recent comment was regarding where I live; not in Wisconsin. Maybe you should call the DNR back and ask why they gave you incorrect information.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DavidOH wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

Save the Buffalo! Cage your cat!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

JM,

I called Wisconsin DNR. I talked to a current representitive. They said that if people are dropping off cats and charlieelk is shooting them, he is breaking the law. Since you don't trust the internet their number is 1-888-936-7463. Please tell us the circumstance where it is legal to kill a cat in Wisconsin. No, the internt is not always factual, that is why I called the DNR.

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from charlie elk wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

Someone said this gets complicated and it does. schmakenzie if you quote laws as to who is violating what then you must read all the laws in total and know the complete story. The law you site specifically exempts acts of hunting and agriculture. Now I know cats are not hunted, so we'll skip over that part. Right to Farm laws in WI are another matter and they apply, giving any farmer the right to kill any animal causing damage on his property. In some cases a permit is required and usually freely given like in the case of wolves, cougars, deer, turkey and yes feral cats and dogs etc.
Domestic animals are considered personal property and may not be harmed however, the owner is financially responsible for any damage they cause.
Feral- means there is no owner- so back to feral cats- there is no law that prevents anyone from capturing one, it then becomes their property and you may dispose of your property.
Yes I suppose if an owner missed..? Well rest assured I have never missed, this is all done at very close range.
And now to throw some really cold water all your legal arguments concerning me;
I have a permit. You see mrs elk and I do sanctioned animal rescue, sometimes the county even pays us. As anyone who does this community service knows there is a lot personal pain involved when there are too many unwanted animals.
Have you ever seen, in action the gas chambers used by humane societies to kill unwanted pets?
Our process is much more humane than that.
later,
charlie

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

@schmakenzie,
I didn't use the internet. I asked my neighbor and talked to the current game warden in our area over the phone. My neighbor is a retired game warden(he was a game warden for more than 30 years and dealt with cases regarding feral cats multiple times). The current game warden I contacted over the phone also stated that it was legal given the circumstances I described. I find them more trustworthy than what you are finding on the internet(then again, everything you read on the internet is 100% factual right?) and pasting verbatim onto this website.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from pjmdy wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

I have long advocated that if dogs in Ohio need licensed and controlled by leash laws (i.e. not permitted to roam freely), then the same should apply to domestic cats. Control is necessary. Also, domestic cats have been shown to be the top killers in the cat kingdom, because they don't just hunt for food, they just kill for the "fun" of it. This was per another nature study I read about several months back. Cats also seem more liable to rabies than dogs, so all things considered, spay, neuter and keep under control.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

JM,

"-A feral cat on his property can be treated just like a pet he would keep in his house(legally). This means that he can kill them legally(just like your own animal), the only rule being that you kill them without causing too much pain...technically if you miss and cause harm to the animal it becomes illegal." You are completely wrong. I presented the parts of the law below for your reading. Would you like to talk with the Wisconsin DNR or Wisconsin animal control? They could fill you in further. You can not kill cats in wisconsin legally. Cut and paste your proof that you can. We would all like to see the facts and not just opinions. I pasted laws and facts off of websites. Please do the same.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

@schmakenzie,
-I understand what the laws you are posting state, but you must realize that there are MANY exceptions to them.
-A feral cat on his property can be treated just like a pet he would keep in his house(legally). This means that he can kill them legally(just like your own animal), the only rule being that you kill them without causing too much pain...technically if you miss and cause harm to the animal it becomes illegal.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntfishtrap wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

I largely agree with schmakenzie on this issue, and I would also add, how does one go about determining that a cat is feral?
Obviously, if it looks wild and unkempt, it probably isn't someone's pet, but not all feral cats look like that. And you can't just go by how far you are from people's houses, I have seen cats that I recognized as being neighborhood pets up to 1/2 mile from the nearest house.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

Charlieelk, Did you say you are from Wisconsin? Section 951.02 of the Wisconsin Statutes states that "No person may treat any animal, whether belonging to the person or another, in a cruel manner." The only exception indicated in this law is for "bona fide experiments carried on for scientific research or normal and accepted veterinary practices." "Cruel" is defined in section 951.01 as "causing unnecessary and excessive pain or suffering or unjustifiable injury or death." Section 174.01, which restricts killing of dogs, states that it does not apply "to a person killing his or her own dog in a proper and humane manner." I do not know how Wisconsin courts have interpreted these two sections of law together but it is clear that section 951.02 prohibits causing unjustifiable death to an animal, even by owners.

A few years ago voters in Wisconsin approved a referendum supporting hunting of feral cats but, thankfully, that proposal was never enacted. Cats are protected under section 951.02. I think that most judges would determine that shooting cats violates section 951.02.

Good Day Charlie Elk!

-2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Victor Rossi wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

Getting Complicated

As simple as we would like our lives to be, things occasionally pop up to challenge our beliefs and values.
As if the gun control puzzle wasn't enough, up pops the killer cat issue. Yes, we live in the country, and yes we have had a cat or two.

With seemingly out of control field mice populations, or at least it appeared that way, a living exterminator was necessary. Trouble is, now we learn that cat's mice diet was being augmented by a birdie or two. The same birdies that we spent good money for their winter seed were being eaten by our cats. Or, were we acting as bird ranchers for the benefit of our cats?

So now we have a feed the birds to feed the cats issue. We could just forget about the birds or we can change cat behavior (good luck). Still trying to figure out how our cat caught a flying squirrel.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

charlieelk, Why don't you re-read what you wrote at the bottom. Those are your words. Let’s set the record straight: Intentionally killing a cat is a criminal offense in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, regardless of ownership. Anti-cruelty laws apply to all cats—companion, abandoned, lost, and feral—and there is no such thing as a “piping plover defense". Please show us where it is legal to kill 50 house cats a year that have been dropped off at your place. Website? Government Agency? Maybe I am Wrong?

-3 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

schmakenzie you are simply wrong about the illegality of killing FERAL cats. I am not up on the laws you site in all states however, in my home state of WI you cannot kill a cat owned by another as that is the destruction of their personal property. Nor can you inflict stress or pain on it. That is as it should be.
Now if the cat has been dumped/orphaned on my property it is now my personal property and I have the legal right to dispose of said property. I know the neighboring property owner's cats and I don't bother them.
Just for the record I have found homes for many cats over the years.
I find it very distasteful to kill animals for the sake of killing them.
later,
charlie

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntfishtrap wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

I'm no puritan, but this is supposed to be a family-friendly website, so what's up with all the swearing in your article Gerry?
As far as the study is concerned, I live on a farm, and we have 5 barn cats that roam freely outside, and we rely heavily on them to keep the rodent population down around the buildings, and to keep the rabbits, ground squirrels, and other varmints away from the garden. Yes, they sometimes do wander off and kill birds and other critters that wouldn't be a problem for us, but that doesn't mean they're going around decimating the area's wildlife all the time, and we would be very upset, understandably so I hope, if some yahoo started killing them simply because they weren't kept locked indoors.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

I don't mind cats, in fact they are interesting. However, owners of cats need to take responsibility for them. They should not be allowed to run free outside. Its a cats nature to hunt and that has to be controlled by the owner.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

Fast Facts About Anti-Cruelty Laws


50 states and DC have anti-cruelty laws that make intentionally killing a cat a crime.


46 states and DC have felony penalties for aggravated acts of animal cruelty.


Eight states authorize courts to include animals in protective orders in domestic violence cases.


28 states authorize mental health evaluations or counseling upon conviction of anti-cruelty charges.

-2 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

We own a solid black cat that was wild up until about 1 year old. We let her outside one night and within 5 minutes she dropped a rabbit off on the porch and was scratching at the door(the dogs tried to take credit for the kill). She ran inside and laid down next to my little cousin on the couch like nothing had happened. Crazy cat even killed a muskrat once.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from elkslayer wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

"Ditch Cougars" that's what we call them, they are a shoot on site varmint.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MazPower wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

Cats are the ultimate at leading a double life, they're exceptional killing machines when they want to be.

As a kid, I'd shoot any cat (pellet gun) that came into our yard. I only know of 4 that I actually killed. Nice to know I was helping the local wildlife, even if unknowingly.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

Glad to hear the Ivory Tower inhabitants are catching up to us sportsmen. These studies always hit me as a real "DUH!"
I shoot upwards of 50 feral cats per year because idiots from the cities come to the country to throw em away. Too bad those folks don't have the fortitude to take care of their own problem. Perhaps if they are that dumb they'll register their cats and I can collect the tags from the dead kitties and send them...
Where would I send them again?
later,
charlie

+2 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)

from JM wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

We own a solid black cat that was wild up until about 1 year old. We let her outside one night and within 5 minutes she dropped a rabbit off on the porch and was scratching at the door(the dogs tried to take credit for the kill). She ran inside and laid down next to my little cousin on the couch like nothing had happened. Crazy cat even killed a muskrat once.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

I don't mind cats, in fact they are interesting. However, owners of cats need to take responsibility for them. They should not be allowed to run free outside. Its a cats nature to hunt and that has to be controlled by the owner.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from LovesOutdoors wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

I posted a trail camera photo on this Outdoor Life website titled "Stalked By A Predator". The photo showed a cat stalking two turkey hens. The motion camera click at the perfect time. Outdoor Life has the photo listed on the best photos of 2012.
A house cat sleeps in a warm house, gets a nice meal and goes outside to kill small game, song birds and other wildlife, that are trying to survive the elements.
Cat owners are stupid to let that cat out to kill or be killed by bigger animals, birds of prey, Rabies and Lyme disease.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

Glad to hear the Ivory Tower inhabitants are catching up to us sportsmen. These studies always hit me as a real "DUH!"
I shoot upwards of 50 feral cats per year because idiots from the cities come to the country to throw em away. Too bad those folks don't have the fortitude to take care of their own problem. Perhaps if they are that dumb they'll register their cats and I can collect the tags from the dead kitties and send them...
Where would I send them again?
later,
charlie

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MazPower wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

Cats are the ultimate at leading a double life, they're exceptional killing machines when they want to be.

As a kid, I'd shoot any cat (pellet gun) that came into our yard. I only know of 4 that I actually killed. Nice to know I was helping the local wildlife, even if unknowingly.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from elkslayer wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

"Ditch Cougars" that's what we call them, they are a shoot on site varmint.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

schmakenzie you are simply wrong about the illegality of killing FERAL cats. I am not up on the laws you site in all states however, in my home state of WI you cannot kill a cat owned by another as that is the destruction of their personal property. Nor can you inflict stress or pain on it. That is as it should be.
Now if the cat has been dumped/orphaned on my property it is now my personal property and I have the legal right to dispose of said property. I know the neighboring property owner's cats and I don't bother them.
Just for the record I have found homes for many cats over the years.
I find it very distasteful to kill animals for the sake of killing them.
later,
charlie

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from pjmdy wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

I have long advocated that if dogs in Ohio need licensed and controlled by leash laws (i.e. not permitted to roam freely), then the same should apply to domestic cats. Control is necessary. Also, domestic cats have been shown to be the top killers in the cat kingdom, because they don't just hunt for food, they just kill for the "fun" of it. This was per another nature study I read about several months back. Cats also seem more liable to rabies than dogs, so all things considered, spay, neuter and keep under control.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

Someone said this gets complicated and it does. schmakenzie if you quote laws as to who is violating what then you must read all the laws in total and know the complete story. The law you site specifically exempts acts of hunting and agriculture. Now I know cats are not hunted, so we'll skip over that part. Right to Farm laws in WI are another matter and they apply, giving any farmer the right to kill any animal causing damage on his property. In some cases a permit is required and usually freely given like in the case of wolves, cougars, deer, turkey and yes feral cats and dogs etc.
Domestic animals are considered personal property and may not be harmed however, the owner is financially responsible for any damage they cause.
Feral- means there is no owner- so back to feral cats- there is no law that prevents anyone from capturing one, it then becomes their property and you may dispose of your property.
Yes I suppose if an owner missed..? Well rest assured I have never missed, this is all done at very close range.
And now to throw some really cold water all your legal arguments concerning me;
I have a permit. You see mrs elk and I do sanctioned animal rescue, sometimes the county even pays us. As anyone who does this community service knows there is a lot personal pain involved when there are too many unwanted animals.
Have you ever seen, in action the gas chambers used by humane societies to kill unwanted pets?
Our process is much more humane than that.
later,
charlie

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from DavidOH wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

Save the Buffalo! Cage your cat!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

@schmakenzie,
-I understand what the laws you are posting state, but you must realize that there are MANY exceptions to them.
-A feral cat on his property can be treated just like a pet he would keep in his house(legally). This means that he can kill them legally(just like your own animal), the only rule being that you kill them without causing too much pain...technically if you miss and cause harm to the animal it becomes illegal.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

@schmakenzie,
I didn't use the internet. I asked my neighbor and talked to the current game warden in our area over the phone. My neighbor is a retired game warden(he was a game warden for more than 30 years and dealt with cases regarding feral cats multiple times). The current game warden I contacted over the phone also stated that it was legal given the circumstances I described. I find them more trustworthy than what you are finding on the internet(then again, everything you read on the internet is 100% factual right?) and pasting verbatim onto this website.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

I think Charlie already provided a situation for when it is legal to kill a FERAL cat in WI...plus my most recent comment was regarding where I live; not in Wisconsin. Maybe you should call the DNR back and ask why they gave you incorrect information.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from MNwhitetailHunter wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

this argument has turned into a bitc*n match. Really, the only thing that is being fought over is someone who thinks they are right. nothing said here is going to change any ones beliefs. i think its a waste of time trying to tell someone what they can and cant do/believe. And no offense schmakenzie, but you do know that you are commenting on a website that most people believe in pro hunting/human rights and as the saying goes, if you cant take the heat, get out of the kitchen.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

@schmakenzie,
Challenge accepted. I tend to learn/benefit more when someone presents a different opinion on a situation.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ILikePike wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

I live in Wisconsin. Tonight, when the old lady got home from work, I had left the door open in the breezeway that goes to the garage. The garage door was also open so she could drive in easily. She came home, went into the breezeway and closed the door. She was startled as a cat was trying to jump threw a window in the breezeway, that was not our cat. I think the cat was eating some old food our cat would not eat, and it was frozen in the dish, but now it is eaten. But anyway, could I have legally took my shotgun and blow the cat in half? It was an animal that was in my household, but not my cat. And it did scare the hell outa the old lady.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Laume702 wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

I can't believe you actually printed this article. This has liberal overtones all over it. Without cats the Earth would be over run with unwanted pests from insects to the unwanted mammal variety. My dog and cat actually hunted together. My Mom and Dad were over run with gophers. SO I took my dog down to their house for a visit and the dog cleaned up the gopher population within two weeks.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Victor Rossi wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

Getting Complicated

As simple as we would like our lives to be, things occasionally pop up to challenge our beliefs and values.
As if the gun control puzzle wasn't enough, up pops the killer cat issue. Yes, we live in the country, and yes we have had a cat or two.

With seemingly out of control field mice populations, or at least it appeared that way, a living exterminator was necessary. Trouble is, now we learn that cat's mice diet was being augmented by a birdie or two. The same birdies that we spent good money for their winter seed were being eaten by our cats. Or, were we acting as bird ranchers for the benefit of our cats?

So now we have a feed the birds to feed the cats issue. We could just forget about the birds or we can change cat behavior (good luck). Still trying to figure out how our cat caught a flying squirrel.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntfishtrap wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

I largely agree with schmakenzie on this issue, and I would also add, how does one go about determining that a cat is feral?
Obviously, if it looks wild and unkempt, it probably isn't someone's pet, but not all feral cats look like that. And you can't just go by how far you are from people's houses, I have seen cats that I recognized as being neighborhood pets up to 1/2 mile from the nearest house.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

JM,

"-A feral cat on his property can be treated just like a pet he would keep in his house(legally). This means that he can kill them legally(just like your own animal), the only rule being that you kill them without causing too much pain...technically if you miss and cause harm to the animal it becomes illegal." You are completely wrong. I presented the parts of the law below for your reading. Would you like to talk with the Wisconsin DNR or Wisconsin animal control? They could fill you in further. You can not kill cats in wisconsin legally. Cut and paste your proof that you can. We would all like to see the facts and not just opinions. I pasted laws and facts off of websites. Please do the same.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

JM,

I called Wisconsin DNR. I talked to a current representitive. They said that if people are dropping off cats and charlieelk is shooting them, he is breaking the law. Since you don't trust the internet their number is 1-888-936-7463. Please tell us the circumstance where it is legal to kill a cat in Wisconsin. No, the internt is not always factual, that is why I called the DNR.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

MNwhitetailhunter, I am a hunter also. I love the heat, it's fun for me and I learn a lot from other people. I do feel I am right and have proved it several times. Some people agree with me as you have seen and others have not, that's ok. We don't have to agree on everything. What fun would that be? There is a lot of gray areas when it comes to cats in the wild and debating like this gives perspectives. Sometimes I am wrong on here and I have learned that. I try to keep it civil, but I do get negatives sometimes. I love outdoor life and look forward to the blogs and debates.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from LovesOutdoors wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

schmakenize,
You said your a hunter. This happen to me while I was out hunting a few years ago.
If you were in the woods hunting, and you saw three well groomed dogs wearing collars chasing a deer, and the larger dog was biting at the deer's back leg. What would you do? Open your Wisconsin law book, call the game warden, call 911, give the dogs a milk bone or would you shoot the dogs?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

lovesoutdoors,

I am making a lot of assumptions on the situation. I would do nothing. Chances are if the dogs are well groomed and the deer is healthy, the deer will out run the dogs in the end. I have dogs come through my hunting areas time to time while I am deer hunting. It sucks, sometimes ruins the hunt. My feeling angry is more towards the owner of the dog than the dog. The dog doesn't know any better he is just a dog being a dog, but the owner knows better. I have never experienced this kind of situation over and over. If I did I would call a rescue organization. Rescue organizations are willing and able to take care of these situations for free and are very skillfull at what they do.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DaBears wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

Feral cats are coyote chocolate. As much as I hate to admit it, "what is a coyote" is the perfect answer to Feral cats for $500 Alex.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntfishtrap wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

I'm no puritan, but this is supposed to be a family-friendly website, so what's up with all the swearing in your article Gerry?
As far as the study is concerned, I live on a farm, and we have 5 barn cats that roam freely outside, and we rely heavily on them to keep the rodent population down around the buildings, and to keep the rabbits, ground squirrels, and other varmints away from the garden. Yes, they sometimes do wander off and kill birds and other critters that wouldn't be a problem for us, but that doesn't mean they're going around decimating the area's wildlife all the time, and we would be very upset, understandably so I hope, if some yahoo started killing them simply because they weren't kept locked indoors.

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from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

lovesoutdoors,

I am making a lot of assumptions on the situation. I would do nothing. Chances are if the dogs are well groomed and the deer is healthy, the deer will out run the dogs in the end. I have dogs come through my hunting areas time to time while I am deer hunting. It sucks, sometimes ruins the hunt. My feeling angry is more towards the owner of the dog than the dog. The dog doesn't know any better he is just a dog being a dog, but the owner knows better. I have never experienced this kind of situation over and over. If I did I would call a rescue organization. Rescue organizations are willing and able to take care of these situations for free and are very skillfull at what they do.

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from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

Fast Facts About Anti-Cruelty Laws


50 states and DC have anti-cruelty laws that make intentionally killing a cat a crime.


46 states and DC have felony penalties for aggravated acts of animal cruelty.


Eight states authorize courts to include animals in protective orders in domestic violence cases.


28 states authorize mental health evaluations or counseling upon conviction of anti-cruelty charges.

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from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

Charlieelk, Did you say you are from Wisconsin? Section 951.02 of the Wisconsin Statutes states that "No person may treat any animal, whether belonging to the person or another, in a cruel manner." The only exception indicated in this law is for "bona fide experiments carried on for scientific research or normal and accepted veterinary practices." "Cruel" is defined in section 951.01 as "causing unnecessary and excessive pain or suffering or unjustifiable injury or death." Section 174.01, which restricts killing of dogs, states that it does not apply "to a person killing his or her own dog in a proper and humane manner." I do not know how Wisconsin courts have interpreted these two sections of law together but it is clear that section 951.02 prohibits causing unjustifiable death to an animal, even by owners.

A few years ago voters in Wisconsin approved a referendum supporting hunting of feral cats but, thankfully, that proposal was never enacted. Cats are protected under section 951.02. I think that most judges would determine that shooting cats violates section 951.02.

Good Day Charlie Elk!

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from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

charlieelk, Why don't you re-read what you wrote at the bottom. Those are your words. Let’s set the record straight: Intentionally killing a cat is a criminal offense in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, regardless of ownership. Anti-cruelty laws apply to all cats—companion, abandoned, lost, and feral—and there is no such thing as a “piping plover defense". Please show us where it is legal to kill 50 house cats a year that have been dropped off at your place. Website? Government Agency? Maybe I am Wrong?

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