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How To Make A Quick Camp Stove: The Fire Can

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January 27, 2012
How To Make A Quick Camp Stove: The Fire Can - 5

There are plenty of do-it-yourself camp stove ideas on the Internet. Some are new and some are classics, but few are as resourceful as the fire can. Here’s a fun little project you can do this weekend.

This simple contraption is made from any cast-off flat can (like a tuna can). You’ll also need some thin snips of cardboard, cut as wide as the can is tall (any length will work). And finally, you’ll require some candle wax, new or old. This wax component is a great way to use up candle drippings or old candle nubs.

Constructing the fire can is pretty simple. Coil up your cardboard strips inside the can until it is full of cardboard. Melt your wax over a medium heat, preferably in a disposable container like another tin can. Pour the melted wax into the fire can until the cardboard is almost covered.

Now let the fire can cool until the wax is hardened (unless you need it right away). Your fire can will need a steady open flame to light, and it will take about one minute to get part of the can lit. However, once it finally is lit, it is hard to put out.

Try this out as a wet-weather fire starter, by burning the fire can under your kindling. Just remember to remove the Fire Can as soon as the fire starts to catch so you can re-use this little stove.

You can also use this little guy to warm food; heat up tea and coffee; or make hot cocoa.

Comments (5)

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from Tioughnioga 8/15/2013 at 12:39pm

I used to use these for boiling tea-water and thawing out fingers while ice-fishing. They really do burn a heck of a long time.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bearx3 1/31/2012 at 07:03pm

girl scouts have made these at camp for years.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bob Hansen 1/27/2012 at 08:59pm

Hi...

Earlier this week I tried out the one I made a couple of weeks ago. It does burn quite well, and apparently very hot.

Downside? Lots of soot when the whole surface is burning.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from gmarkum 1/27/2012 at 01:00pm

I have made a couple of these "hobo stoves" and I like them better than the military versions of trioxane. The last one I made was from an old spaghetti o's can. I have not yet run it out of fuel. Another tip I discovered is if you use one of the "safety" side cutting can openers you can re-use the lid to keep dirt and stuff out of the stove and to put out the flame when you are finished with it.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog 1/27/2012 at 10:57am

This is a great tip. You could stick one in your backpack and be fire ready if needed. I'm going to make a few.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)

from gmarkum 1/27/2012 at 01:00pm

I have made a couple of these "hobo stoves" and I like them better than the military versions of trioxane. The last one I made was from an old spaghetti o's can. I have not yet run it out of fuel. Another tip I discovered is if you use one of the "safety" side cutting can openers you can re-use the lid to keep dirt and stuff out of the stove and to put out the flame when you are finished with it.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from bearx3 1/31/2012 at 07:03pm

girl scouts have made these at camp for years.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog 1/27/2012 at 10:57am

This is a great tip. You could stick one in your backpack and be fire ready if needed. I'm going to make a few.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bob Hansen 1/27/2012 at 08:59pm

Hi...

Earlier this week I tried out the one I made a couple of weeks ago. It does burn quite well, and apparently very hot.

Downside? Lots of soot when the whole surface is burning.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tioughnioga 8/15/2013 at 12:39pm

I used to use these for boiling tea-water and thawing out fingers while ice-fishing. They really do burn a heck of a long time.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)