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Snake Bite Warning

Snake Bite Warning

EXTREMELY GRAPHIC CONTENT: Summer and snakebite go hand in hand. Here's how not to become a victim.
Snakebite 2

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from hanshi wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

While I don't believe in killing ANY snake just because it is a snake, I concede there are situations where it is probably a good idea for reasons of safety. I lived in Georgia for 60 years and rattlesnakes (canebreaks and pigmy) along with copperheads and cottonmouths were extremely common. We've had them on our porch, in the barn and laying around on my back yard shooting range. I always moved them off the road when encountered to keep them from being killed. Otherwise I enjoyed them as part of the natural world. We did have a (large) dog get bitten by a copperhead - I caught it and kept it in a terrarium through the summer before releasing it in plenty of time for fall. The dog's face swelled up and she was really sick for several days. We kept her inside and monitored her condition. Big rat snakes were everywhere.

On a lighter note just being in Alaska gives only partial relief. I spent two winters there trapping fur snakes - where do you think fur boas come from? Never heard of a trapper getting bit but it's not unusual for the customer to get bit!

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from vineyardfarms wrote 3 years 42 weeks ago

Thats exactly why the only good snake is a dead snake!!!!

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from BuckBoy97 wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

a lot of peaple say "the only good snake is a dead snake" and "the only snake that won't bite is a dead snake"

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from BeardogRed wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Thanks for the reminder. I was just wondering about that same information. I guess it is best to always research the type of venomous snakes in the area you are going to hunt, and their behavior, and habitat!

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from arkansas redneck wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Man I wonder what kind of snake could do that to someone arm.

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from jjjones wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

"After this young man was bitten on the palm of his hand, his entire arm became swollen to the point doctors decided to perform a fasciotomy from the palm of his hand to his bicep to relieve pressure."
Says it right there in the bottom of the article folks. The muscular tissue was exposed due to the skin being cut by the doctors to relieve the pressure in the arm

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from JoeHunter wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I was always told to step UP on the log or rock and look down for snakes before stepping down while in snake country. Never step over any object because rattlesnakes like to lay right in the crease to sun themselves. While fishing, Grandpa always walked with his rod tip low to the ground and ahead of him, the rattlesnakes would strike his pole, not his leg. He had a Quart jar full of rattles to prove it worked.

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from Bo wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

capnvega, your understanding is correct, that is exactly why they do the fasciotomy.

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from Glorifiedmidget wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

stitches... you mean bailing twine? that's what it looked like they had to keep his hand together...

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from capnvega wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I used to drive a rescue ambulance in Yuma, AZ and saw a number of rattlesnake bite victims. The one that stands out was an old bum who tried to get some shade under a creosote bush and sat on a big "coon-tail" rattler. He killed the snake and took it with him to the hi-way where he pointed to it and then to his leg, the second car that went by stopped for him and took him to a rendezvous with us. Now who would have stopped on a 70mph hi-way for a hitch hiking bum if he hadn't had that snake to show his emergency? Also the dead snake helped the Doctor identify the correct anti-venom to administer. I followed up the guy in the hospital and watched his leg swell up huge, turn black, and nearly require the same surgery as the Arm Guy. As I understand it, when your extremity swells it can press on the arteries and veins and keep the blood flow from from them, thereby creating a gangrene like affect that could potentially result in the loss of the limb.

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from LDENJP wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Please expain to your readers that the extent of the open wound on the forearm is due to the procedure (fasciotomy)-not necessarily the snakebite itself. The procedure was required to stop even further tissue destruction from the snake venom.

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from patrick88 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

it all depends on how well you react to the bite some do well others dont.it has alot to do with allergies!hope he gets well soon.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DavHrcr wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I feel sorry for the guy, must to have been something to endure to say the least, he's lucky he didn't loose his life, and also lucky he didn't loose his hand or arm.

David

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from jacy1515 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

If you are vein bitten by a fired up pit viper you will be lucky to get out of the woods.The destructive power of the venom should be respected. Have had a lot of small cottonmouths around this year and know that where there aresmall ones there are big ones.

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from Jerod Henderson wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

OOOOOUCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCHHHHHHHHH !!!

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from bwaters13 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

That guys lucky to even be alive. Thats a nasty bite

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from Yoda wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Wow that guy is lucky, that is alot of surgery that is nuts

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from jake675309 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I agree, they are tasty! I grew up in Eastern Oregon where the Timber Rattlesnakes could EASILY grow to 6+ feet in length and have a girth of 9" circumference. Lots of meat on those bad boys.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nomad wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

That's why I kill every rattlesnake I come across if possible. I know some folks will think that's harsh but drop the guy in the picture a line and see what he thinks. I live in Southwestern Arizona where we have mostly Western Diamondbacks but occasionally you will run across a Mojave Green. I've killed four in the last 3 months, one in front of my porch, one in my side yard and two at the bottom of the hill. The last about a week ago had double fangs! A neighbor kid almost got bit by him on the way home from the bus stop. And yes...They are tasty.

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from bigjake wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I thought my arms were a mess, jesus that looks painful

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from Kody wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Those pictures could sponsor in influx of retirees to the Great White North where we have no such snakes. When I am cursing cold this winter I will remind myself that cold is the best snake protection around.

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from GerryBethge wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Guys....It was a Northern Pacific rattlesnake and the incident took place near Yosemite in Northern California.

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from Bo wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

billybowfreak69, yeah, that was a rattlesnake. In some textbooks you can find worse cases, and photos. cjohnsrud, if there was enough venom injected, a rattlesnake can easily do that, once it is injected it starts breaking down the tissue that it acts on. All pit vipers are bad news, none of them are good, except to eat.
If you have more than a grade 1 envonomation,I think, that is what the standard is, it is a very good idea to get antivenom. There is new stuff out, I think it is called Cro-Fab or something like that, and is not supposed to be as prone to anaphyllaxis as the old stuff was. I am going by memory here and the last time I gave antivenom was at least 14 or 15 years ago, and that guy ended up in ICU, because of the reaction to the antivenom serum given then. I have not used the new stuff but it is supposed to be better.
The only crotalid bite that is good is one that there is no envenomation grade 0 and then you get a tetanus, antibiotics, and a recheck to make sure you are okay.

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from hanshi wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Coral snakes along with most other "neurotoxic" snakes don't cause that degree of tissue damage. Copperheads and water moccasins are very, very bad but seldom cause death or such horrible tissue destruction. The hunter killed by the rattlesnake in Georgia was only a few miles from our house. He died within minutes. The victim in the photo was bitten by a rattlesnake.

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from cjohnsrud wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I don't think that was a Rattlesnake bite. Unless the victim took a LONG time getting to help. That was some serious toxin whatever it was.

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from seadog wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

These pictures will make it easier for me to put on my 16" snake boots when I'd really rather wear my 9" hunting boots. Someone should tell my wife how safety conscious I am--but don't let her see these pictures or she'll hide the keys to my truck.
P.S. I think it was a rattlesnake. The bottom of the story next to pic #1 talks about rattlesnake venom.

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from billybowfreak69 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

that is as bad of snakebite photos EVER!!!! had to have been a coral snake??? or snake non-native to U.S. it's B.S. that type of snake was not identified?!?!???? venomous snakes are no flippin joke!! watch where u reach& step!!!

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from jamesti wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

ok, i have to know what kind of snake that was! something not right about that. cool scar though.

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from jamesti wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

that's what i loved about alaska. none of that stuff there.

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from johnson4x4 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I can't believe he made a recovery. 80%? arm looks like a toothpick.

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from tweekskratch wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Dude got demolished.

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from OK Beef wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

More proof that ALL snakes are deadly - some are poisonous, but they're all deadly!

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from JBUG308 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Wonder what kind of snake it was?

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from vineyardfarms wrote 3 years 42 weeks ago

Thats exactly why the only good snake is a dead snake!!!!

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from hanshi wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Coral snakes along with most other "neurotoxic" snakes don't cause that degree of tissue damage. Copperheads and water moccasins are very, very bad but seldom cause death or such horrible tissue destruction. The hunter killed by the rattlesnake in Georgia was only a few miles from our house. He died within minutes. The victim in the photo was bitten by a rattlesnake.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nomad wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

That's why I kill every rattlesnake I come across if possible. I know some folks will think that's harsh but drop the guy in the picture a line and see what he thinks. I live in Southwestern Arizona where we have mostly Western Diamondbacks but occasionally you will run across a Mojave Green. I've killed four in the last 3 months, one in front of my porch, one in my side yard and two at the bottom of the hill. The last about a week ago had double fangs! A neighbor kid almost got bit by him on the way home from the bus stop. And yes...They are tasty.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from jake675309 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I agree, they are tasty! I grew up in Eastern Oregon where the Timber Rattlesnakes could EASILY grow to 6+ feet in length and have a girth of 9" circumference. Lots of meat on those bad boys.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from jacy1515 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

If you are vein bitten by a fired up pit viper you will be lucky to get out of the woods.The destructive power of the venom should be respected. Have had a lot of small cottonmouths around this year and know that where there aresmall ones there are big ones.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from JBUG308 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Wonder what kind of snake it was?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

ok, i have to know what kind of snake that was! something not right about that. cool scar though.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from LDENJP wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Please expain to your readers that the extent of the open wound on the forearm is due to the procedure (fasciotomy)-not necessarily the snakebite itself. The procedure was required to stop even further tissue destruction from the snake venom.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jjjones wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

"After this young man was bitten on the palm of his hand, his entire arm became swollen to the point doctors decided to perform a fasciotomy from the palm of his hand to his bicep to relieve pressure."
Says it right there in the bottom of the article folks. The muscular tissue was exposed due to the skin being cut by the doctors to relieve the pressure in the arm

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from BuckBoy97 wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

a lot of peaple say "the only good snake is a dead snake" and "the only snake that won't bite is a dead snake"

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from hanshi wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

While I don't believe in killing ANY snake just because it is a snake, I concede there are situations where it is probably a good idea for reasons of safety. I lived in Georgia for 60 years and rattlesnakes (canebreaks and pigmy) along with copperheads and cottonmouths were extremely common. We've had them on our porch, in the barn and laying around on my back yard shooting range. I always moved them off the road when encountered to keep them from being killed. Otherwise I enjoyed them as part of the natural world. We did have a (large) dog get bitten by a copperhead - I caught it and kept it in a terrarium through the summer before releasing it in plenty of time for fall. The dog's face swelled up and she was really sick for several days. We kept her inside and monitored her condition. Big rat snakes were everywhere.

On a lighter note just being in Alaska gives only partial relief. I spent two winters there trapping fur snakes - where do you think fur boas come from? Never heard of a trapper getting bit but it's not unusual for the customer to get bit!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from tweekskratch wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Dude got demolished.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from johnson4x4 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I can't believe he made a recovery. 80%? arm looks like a toothpick.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

that's what i loved about alaska. none of that stuff there.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bo wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

billybowfreak69, yeah, that was a rattlesnake. In some textbooks you can find worse cases, and photos. cjohnsrud, if there was enough venom injected, a rattlesnake can easily do that, once it is injected it starts breaking down the tissue that it acts on. All pit vipers are bad news, none of them are good, except to eat.
If you have more than a grade 1 envonomation,I think, that is what the standard is, it is a very good idea to get antivenom. There is new stuff out, I think it is called Cro-Fab or something like that, and is not supposed to be as prone to anaphyllaxis as the old stuff was. I am going by memory here and the last time I gave antivenom was at least 14 or 15 years ago, and that guy ended up in ICU, because of the reaction to the antivenom serum given then. I have not used the new stuff but it is supposed to be better.
The only crotalid bite that is good is one that there is no envenomation grade 0 and then you get a tetanus, antibiotics, and a recheck to make sure you are okay.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from GerryBethge wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Guys....It was a Northern Pacific rattlesnake and the incident took place near Yosemite in Northern California.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bigjake wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I thought my arms were a mess, jesus that looks painful

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Yoda wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Wow that guy is lucky, that is alot of surgery that is nuts

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bwaters13 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

That guys lucky to even be alive. Thats a nasty bite

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JoeHunter wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I was always told to step UP on the log or rock and look down for snakes before stepping down while in snake country. Never step over any object because rattlesnakes like to lay right in the crease to sun themselves. While fishing, Grandpa always walked with his rod tip low to the ground and ahead of him, the rattlesnakes would strike his pole, not his leg. He had a Quart jar full of rattles to prove it worked.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from arkansas redneck wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Man I wonder what kind of snake could do that to someone arm.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BeardogRed wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Thanks for the reminder. I was just wondering about that same information. I guess it is best to always research the type of venomous snakes in the area you are going to hunt, and their behavior, and habitat!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from seadog wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

These pictures will make it easier for me to put on my 16" snake boots when I'd really rather wear my 9" hunting boots. Someone should tell my wife how safety conscious I am--but don't let her see these pictures or she'll hide the keys to my truck.
P.S. I think it was a rattlesnake. The bottom of the story next to pic #1 talks about rattlesnake venom.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from cjohnsrud wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I don't think that was a Rattlesnake bite. Unless the victim took a LONG time getting to help. That was some serious toxin whatever it was.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kody wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Those pictures could sponsor in influx of retirees to the Great White North where we have no such snakes. When I am cursing cold this winter I will remind myself that cold is the best snake protection around.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DavHrcr wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I feel sorry for the guy, must to have been something to endure to say the least, he's lucky he didn't loose his life, and also lucky he didn't loose his hand or arm.

David

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from capnvega wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I used to drive a rescue ambulance in Yuma, AZ and saw a number of rattlesnake bite victims. The one that stands out was an old bum who tried to get some shade under a creosote bush and sat on a big "coon-tail" rattler. He killed the snake and took it with him to the hi-way where he pointed to it and then to his leg, the second car that went by stopped for him and took him to a rendezvous with us. Now who would have stopped on a 70mph hi-way for a hitch hiking bum if he hadn't had that snake to show his emergency? Also the dead snake helped the Doctor identify the correct anti-venom to administer. I followed up the guy in the hospital and watched his leg swell up huge, turn black, and nearly require the same surgery as the Arm Guy. As I understand it, when your extremity swells it can press on the arteries and veins and keep the blood flow from from them, thereby creating a gangrene like affect that could potentially result in the loss of the limb.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bo wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

capnvega, your understanding is correct, that is exactly why they do the fasciotomy.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jerod Henderson wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

OOOOOUCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCHHHHHHHHH !!!

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from patrick88 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

it all depends on how well you react to the bite some do well others dont.it has alot to do with allergies!hope he gets well soon.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Glorifiedmidget wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

stitches... you mean bailing twine? that's what it looked like they had to keep his hand together...

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from billybowfreak69 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

that is as bad of snakebite photos EVER!!!! had to have been a coral snake??? or snake non-native to U.S. it's B.S. that type of snake was not identified?!?!???? venomous snakes are no flippin joke!! watch where u reach& step!!!

-2 Good Comment? | | Report
from OK Beef wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

More proof that ALL snakes are deadly - some are poisonous, but they're all deadly!

-3 Good Comment? | | Report

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