Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

It's Texas, Baby!

It's Texas, Baby!

Still looking for the best in whitetail hunting? You still need to look at Texas.
Uvalde 1

Comments (8)

Top Rated
All Comments
from The Captain wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

Well, MWK_MN you can ask wherever you hunt what their deer management program is. There are some hunts that are all fair-chase and some that release huge genetics for you to shoot them over a deer feeder. It was not my objective to dissuade you from TX hunting. I have been on some incredibly sporting hunts in the state. But, there are some places that treat deer as straight business--bigger horns = big dollars.
Just ask what the hunting program is. I believe you would do yourself a disservice by completely dismissing TX. There are some great hunting opportunities there.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MWK_MN wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

Thanks Captain. I would never pay to shoot a fenced in deer that was massive because he was genetically selected to be. NOT hunting!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from dcintc wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

Any suggestions for Houston area early November hunt?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kody wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

Thank you for the info. I suspect in the not too distant future more and more states and provinces will find themselves with hunting ranges and farms akin to those in Texas. Lostaggie's, I would favour your type of hunting business as it would have a more personal touch. For now I count myself lucky to be able to walk into a farmer's yard and ask permission. Once the farmer sees you are reliable sort permission is usually given free of charge. Meeting these country folks makes the hunt all the more enjoyable. It is a priceless aspect of hunting that would suffer once money enters the equation. I will pay the bucks should that time come. While I hope that day is far off it would not stop me from taking my Granddaughter hunting. She is just one year old but I have already been considering what kind of rifle and shotgun I'll get her. Great fun or what? You can be sure she will have both before her first car..so many interesting places to explore and so much to look forward to ....I will have to live to 100.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from lostaggie wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

In Texas, guiding is done by either outfitters that lease the ranches or the people they hire, or by hunters on specific leases. No licensing is required.

I am the lead hunter on a lease that has 5 hunters, and we are allowed to sell our management deer. Each one of us guides the hunters we bring in to harvest management deer, or if we sell several management deer to a group, we all pitch in and help do the guiding. This is probably the best type of set-up to look for as the lease hunters are more familiar with the country and deer than a guide who is brought in just to guide package hunters.Also, the camp will have a little less "commercial" feel to it. On our ranch a management deer can score up to 140 B&C and is reasonably priced.
Lostaggie

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from The Captain wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

Kody, as I understand it, there are no set guide laws in Texas. You can go to TPWD.com to see out-of-state fees for deer hunting. As I recall, it is about $250 for an out-of-state buck tag. However, you can also hunt exotic species and hogs in conjunction with whitetails in a lot of places (specifically in the central part of the state known as the "hill country").

While I do not believe there is an official guide policy in TX, you will be hard-pressed to hunt public land as the state is 98% private land. Most hunting is done on family-owned land or hunting leases. There are places that offer guided hunts, but most of them charge a lot more money than I am willing to pay to shoot a whitetail. I would prefer to hunt a lease with some of my close friends and family, but a year-long lease would prove expensive and impractical to an out-of-stater.

As to MWK_MN's question, some TX hunts do involve genetically enhanced herds formed from the selective breeding processes that take place in pens. Fawns are selectively bred for big antlers and then weened and released to be hunted in a few years. In a lot of cases you do not have to trace a deer's lineage back to his grandaddy... you can find his father in a breeding pen on the same property.

I hope this helps you gents. There are some great hunting destinations in TX, but in a lot of cases it is very expensive to shoot a bruiser in the Lonestar state.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MWK_MN wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

Wonder if they have any quality public land worth checking out or if you're wasting your time unless you go through a guide. Anyone know? Also what's this I have heard about bucks being released into the wild that have great genes as far as rack quality? Any merit to those accusations? Would hate to be cheated out of a great hunt by knowing that the bruiser I just shot had his grand daddy walk away from a game farm five miles down the road.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kody wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

Sure looks inviting, I especially enjoyed the lay out of pictures following the hunt from arrival through the hunt and final departure. What kind of non resident license charges are there for a whitetail tag in Texas or is that part of a required guide's fees?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)

from Kody wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

Sure looks inviting, I especially enjoyed the lay out of pictures following the hunt from arrival through the hunt and final departure. What kind of non resident license charges are there for a whitetail tag in Texas or is that part of a required guide's fees?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from The Captain wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

Kody, as I understand it, there are no set guide laws in Texas. You can go to TPWD.com to see out-of-state fees for deer hunting. As I recall, it is about $250 for an out-of-state buck tag. However, you can also hunt exotic species and hogs in conjunction with whitetails in a lot of places (specifically in the central part of the state known as the "hill country").

While I do not believe there is an official guide policy in TX, you will be hard-pressed to hunt public land as the state is 98% private land. Most hunting is done on family-owned land or hunting leases. There are places that offer guided hunts, but most of them charge a lot more money than I am willing to pay to shoot a whitetail. I would prefer to hunt a lease with some of my close friends and family, but a year-long lease would prove expensive and impractical to an out-of-stater.

As to MWK_MN's question, some TX hunts do involve genetically enhanced herds formed from the selective breeding processes that take place in pens. Fawns are selectively bred for big antlers and then weened and released to be hunted in a few years. In a lot of cases you do not have to trace a deer's lineage back to his grandaddy... you can find his father in a breeding pen on the same property.

I hope this helps you gents. There are some great hunting destinations in TX, but in a lot of cases it is very expensive to shoot a bruiser in the Lonestar state.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MWK_MN wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

Wonder if they have any quality public land worth checking out or if you're wasting your time unless you go through a guide. Anyone know? Also what's this I have heard about bucks being released into the wild that have great genes as far as rack quality? Any merit to those accusations? Would hate to be cheated out of a great hunt by knowing that the bruiser I just shot had his grand daddy walk away from a game farm five miles down the road.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from MWK_MN wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

Thanks Captain. I would never pay to shoot a fenced in deer that was massive because he was genetically selected to be. NOT hunting!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kody wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

Thank you for the info. I suspect in the not too distant future more and more states and provinces will find themselves with hunting ranges and farms akin to those in Texas. Lostaggie's, I would favour your type of hunting business as it would have a more personal touch. For now I count myself lucky to be able to walk into a farmer's yard and ask permission. Once the farmer sees you are reliable sort permission is usually given free of charge. Meeting these country folks makes the hunt all the more enjoyable. It is a priceless aspect of hunting that would suffer once money enters the equation. I will pay the bucks should that time come. While I hope that day is far off it would not stop me from taking my Granddaughter hunting. She is just one year old but I have already been considering what kind of rifle and shotgun I'll get her. Great fun or what? You can be sure she will have both before her first car..so many interesting places to explore and so much to look forward to ....I will have to live to 100.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from lostaggie wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

In Texas, guiding is done by either outfitters that lease the ranches or the people they hire, or by hunters on specific leases. No licensing is required.

I am the lead hunter on a lease that has 5 hunters, and we are allowed to sell our management deer. Each one of us guides the hunters we bring in to harvest management deer, or if we sell several management deer to a group, we all pitch in and help do the guiding. This is probably the best type of set-up to look for as the lease hunters are more familiar with the country and deer than a guide who is brought in just to guide package hunters.Also, the camp will have a little less "commercial" feel to it. On our ranch a management deer can score up to 140 B&C and is reasonably priced.
Lostaggie

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from The Captain wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

Well, MWK_MN you can ask wherever you hunt what their deer management program is. There are some hunts that are all fair-chase and some that release huge genetics for you to shoot them over a deer feeder. It was not my objective to dissuade you from TX hunting. I have been on some incredibly sporting hunts in the state. But, there are some places that treat deer as straight business--bigger horns = big dollars.
Just ask what the hunting program is. I believe you would do yourself a disservice by completely dismissing TX. There are some great hunting opportunities there.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dcintc wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

Any suggestions for Houston area early November hunt?

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)

1 of 16