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Buried in Alaska

Buried in Alaska

Those of us who live in Alaska are accustomed to extreme weather, but often times, this land dishes out more than we can handle.
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from tylerfreel85 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

ezrvs1, what part of AK did you live in?? I don't remember hearing about that incident, but seems like there's always some kind of incident like that going on. Were you here when those two guys tried to drive their trucks out on the tundra on the north slope (a HUGE no no) and got them stuck like a mile from the road!?

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from ezrvs1 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

My twenty years in Alaska taught me to have respect for the cold. I recall an incident wherein a drunken poacher died from exposure after shooting a moose about 200 yards off a major highway. The local paper later published a letter of condolence to the family...of the moose! Poor, dumb Cheechako.

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from ezrvs1 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

My twenty years in Alaska taught me to have respect for the cold. I recall an incident wherein a drunken poacher died from exposure after shooting a moose about 200 yards off a major highway. The local paper later published a letter of condolence to the family...of the moose! Poor, dumb Cheechako.

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from tylerfreel85 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Haha! no Aron, i have NOT had to "spoon"! haha! I have a LONG contingency list..and that is at the BOTTOM! :)

Montana, I definitely know what you're talkin about! I've seen -60 a few times, and it's just intolerable...people can act as tough as they want, but that is just plain miserable!!!

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from Montanagyrene wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Reading this reminds me of the winter of 88, when we were living in Helena. We had a Canadian cold front swirl down on us, and the wind chill wound up being something like -60. Of course I had a job that required me to be out in it-fortunately only for segments of about 30-45 min at a time. All I can say is I NEVER want to see it get that cold EVER AGAIN!! To paraphrase Gayne, I am a WIMP!!

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from Aron Snyder wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

I'm hoping you have never had to "spoon" before!?! Have you?

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from tylerfreel85 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

GG, good question! I have had some practice with making some winter shelters, but usually that has been practice for a last resort. The snow in this area of Alaska is very dry and pretty impossible to dig caves or anything like that. However, depending on what time and materials you have available on site, you can build a lean-to with spruce branches, cover it with boughs or a tarp, then cover and pack it with snow to help insulate it and it will hold heat surprisingly well!

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from GGNYC wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Tyler, have you ever had to make a snow shelter to ride out the night? do you have any tips for making one?

GG

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from tylerfreel85 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Thanks for the story Kody! It seems to me like some of the hardest, most miserable experiences I have always seem to be the most memorable! Things like having to warm your hands on the barrel of your shotgun (which I am familiar with!) really end up making those memories stick and really add to the experience. I am always fascinated by hearing or reading stories of how tough the old timers had it up here!

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from Kody wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Tylerfree,
I went thru High School in Anchorage. Plenty of snow and darkness thru the winter but that ocean current tended to keep the temperature moderate. However, the weather reports from Fairbanks were always enough to give you the shivers. Still one of my fondest memories is hunting Ptarmigan with my father on one crazy cold day. Those birds were often lost in the explosion of snow from the shrouded little boreal spruce trees that caught part or all of our shotgun blasts. It was so much fun we laughed together 30 years later whenever the outing came to mind. By the way, for those of you who have never fired your shotgun or rifle in minus 30 degree temperatures get ready for a shock. It seems so loud you might think the end of the barrel has blown off. It can downright unnerving! Still, you do what you have to do and I have fired my shotgun repeatedly just to warm my hands on the barrel.

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from tylerfreel85 wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

I heard about that flatbed! In fact, it was warmer up here during your cold spell than it was down there! Weird! You're definitely right Kody! Extreme cold puts a LOT of stress on your body as well as machines! I try not to go out if it's any colder than -30F. This week it's been getting down to -40 at night. It's miserable and everything tends to break down!

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from Kody wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

March came in like a lion in Alberta this year. It has been anywhere from -25 to - 38 in my part of the province. Throw some wind chill into those temperatures and it gets painful. No matter how well you dress your body expends tremendous energy in staying warm and you are exhausted by day's end. We keep working but the equipment shudders in the cold often with expensive consequences. It has been the most challenging winter of work in my 30 years of business. You can take every preventive measure thinkable and still have the cold cause you grief. For those who wish to play in such temperature extremes take a tip from those of us who work in those conditions. A comfortable chair in a warm living room with an icy cold beer in hand is the best way to enjoy a cold winter.

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from Flatbed wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Wow, we had about a foot and a half here in Oklahoma and not above freezing for about 2 weeks, last month. I would hate to be in that kind of cold and deep snow. People that live up there year around are a lot tougher than me. Loved it every time I have been there but it was always summer time.

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from Aron Snyder wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Stay tuned next week on Live Hunt when Tyler Freel writes Live on one cheek and Hunt on the other and run through 5 feet of snow screaming ALASKA RULES!!!

I will be doing the same thing in Colorado, but it will be in the low 60's!

Stay warm buddy!

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from tylerfreel85 wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Yea...it wasn't bad riding all winter, but this snow dump has made it pretty impossible! Thanks!! Keep checking back! we have a LOT in store for this season!

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from crazy canuck wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

It looks like some tough sledding up there. I can't wait for your live hunt updates this year.

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from Alex Robinson wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Tyler, please do not get lost or buried in the Alaskan wilderness before the Live Hunt season actually starts. OL needs you.

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from tylerfreel85 wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Yeah...a tow rope was pretty useless for us in that situation. I know where i've got my traps stashed, so it'll just be a matter of waiting until I can get up there. Worst case I'll have to do an overnight trip & snowshoe back in there to get them

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from MWK_MN wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Smart move on calling it a day. I always bring a tow rope with me but looks like it wouldn't of mattered for you guys, some deep snow ya got there. How did you get the traps latter on? wait for the snow to melt or find a different passable route?

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from tylerfreel85 wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Nope! it was about 20 degrees warmer, it definitely could have gotten a lot worse had we not decided to turn back!!

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from DSMbirddog wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Looks to me like you made a wise choice. It doesn't look as cold this day as your previous story.

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from DSMbirddog wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Looks to me like you made a wise choice. It doesn't look as cold this day as your previous story.

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from tylerfreel85 wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Nope! it was about 20 degrees warmer, it definitely could have gotten a lot worse had we not decided to turn back!!

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from Alex Robinson wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Tyler, please do not get lost or buried in the Alaskan wilderness before the Live Hunt season actually starts. OL needs you.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Aron Snyder wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Stay tuned next week on Live Hunt when Tyler Freel writes Live on one cheek and Hunt on the other and run through 5 feet of snow screaming ALASKA RULES!!!

I will be doing the same thing in Colorado, but it will be in the low 60's!

Stay warm buddy!

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from tylerfreel85 wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

I heard about that flatbed! In fact, it was warmer up here during your cold spell than it was down there! Weird! You're definitely right Kody! Extreme cold puts a LOT of stress on your body as well as machines! I try not to go out if it's any colder than -30F. This week it's been getting down to -40 at night. It's miserable and everything tends to break down!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MWK_MN wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Smart move on calling it a day. I always bring a tow rope with me but looks like it wouldn't of mattered for you guys, some deep snow ya got there. How did you get the traps latter on? wait for the snow to melt or find a different passable route?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tylerfreel85 wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Yeah...a tow rope was pretty useless for us in that situation. I know where i've got my traps stashed, so it'll just be a matter of waiting until I can get up there. Worst case I'll have to do an overnight trip & snowshoe back in there to get them

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from crazy canuck wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

It looks like some tough sledding up there. I can't wait for your live hunt updates this year.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tylerfreel85 wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Yea...it wasn't bad riding all winter, but this snow dump has made it pretty impossible! Thanks!! Keep checking back! we have a LOT in store for this season!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Flatbed wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Wow, we had about a foot and a half here in Oklahoma and not above freezing for about 2 weeks, last month. I would hate to be in that kind of cold and deep snow. People that live up there year around are a lot tougher than me. Loved it every time I have been there but it was always summer time.

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from Kody wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

March came in like a lion in Alberta this year. It has been anywhere from -25 to - 38 in my part of the province. Throw some wind chill into those temperatures and it gets painful. No matter how well you dress your body expends tremendous energy in staying warm and you are exhausted by day's end. We keep working but the equipment shudders in the cold often with expensive consequences. It has been the most challenging winter of work in my 30 years of business. You can take every preventive measure thinkable and still have the cold cause you grief. For those who wish to play in such temperature extremes take a tip from those of us who work in those conditions. A comfortable chair in a warm living room with an icy cold beer in hand is the best way to enjoy a cold winter.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kody wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Tylerfree,
I went thru High School in Anchorage. Plenty of snow and darkness thru the winter but that ocean current tended to keep the temperature moderate. However, the weather reports from Fairbanks were always enough to give you the shivers. Still one of my fondest memories is hunting Ptarmigan with my father on one crazy cold day. Those birds were often lost in the explosion of snow from the shrouded little boreal spruce trees that caught part or all of our shotgun blasts. It was so much fun we laughed together 30 years later whenever the outing came to mind. By the way, for those of you who have never fired your shotgun or rifle in minus 30 degree temperatures get ready for a shock. It seems so loud you might think the end of the barrel has blown off. It can downright unnerving! Still, you do what you have to do and I have fired my shotgun repeatedly just to warm my hands on the barrel.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ezrvs1 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

My twenty years in Alaska taught me to have respect for the cold. I recall an incident wherein a drunken poacher died from exposure after shooting a moose about 200 yards off a major highway. The local paper later published a letter of condolence to the family...of the moose! Poor, dumb Cheechako.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tylerfreel85 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Thanks for the story Kody! It seems to me like some of the hardest, most miserable experiences I have always seem to be the most memorable! Things like having to warm your hands on the barrel of your shotgun (which I am familiar with!) really end up making those memories stick and really add to the experience. I am always fascinated by hearing or reading stories of how tough the old timers had it up here!

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from GGNYC wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Tyler, have you ever had to make a snow shelter to ride out the night? do you have any tips for making one?

GG

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tylerfreel85 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

GG, good question! I have had some practice with making some winter shelters, but usually that has been practice for a last resort. The snow in this area of Alaska is very dry and pretty impossible to dig caves or anything like that. However, depending on what time and materials you have available on site, you can build a lean-to with spruce branches, cover it with boughs or a tarp, then cover and pack it with snow to help insulate it and it will hold heat surprisingly well!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Aron Snyder wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

I'm hoping you have never had to "spoon" before!?! Have you?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Montanagyrene wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Reading this reminds me of the winter of 88, when we were living in Helena. We had a Canadian cold front swirl down on us, and the wind chill wound up being something like -60. Of course I had a job that required me to be out in it-fortunately only for segments of about 30-45 min at a time. All I can say is I NEVER want to see it get that cold EVER AGAIN!! To paraphrase Gayne, I am a WIMP!!

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from tylerfreel85 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Haha! no Aron, i have NOT had to "spoon"! haha! I have a LONG contingency list..and that is at the BOTTOM! :)

Montana, I definitely know what you're talkin about! I've seen -60 a few times, and it's just intolerable...people can act as tough as they want, but that is just plain miserable!!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ezrvs1 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

My twenty years in Alaska taught me to have respect for the cold. I recall an incident wherein a drunken poacher died from exposure after shooting a moose about 200 yards off a major highway. The local paper later published a letter of condolence to the family...of the moose! Poor, dumb Cheechako.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tylerfreel85 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

ezrvs1, what part of AK did you live in?? I don't remember hearing about that incident, but seems like there's always some kind of incident like that going on. Were you here when those two guys tried to drive their trucks out on the tundra on the north slope (a HUGE no no) and got them stuck like a mile from the road!?

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