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Tornado Survival Tips

Tornado Survival Tips

Tornado season is here and several cities around the country have already been devastated by twisters. Here are 10 things you need to know to survive when a tornado hits.
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from mtyburski wrote 7 weeks 3 days ago

Never seen one live, but would be interesting, as far as the science is concerned. Scary experience!

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from Christy wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I was in a tornado once. I was fishing on the Mississippi River and the weather was getting bad so me and my buddy went back to our camp on one of the islands. We waited out the storm in the tent and we could hear trees falling all over. finally the storm slowed down enough to chance going to the boat landing where the van was. We got to the van and turned on the radio and it said the tornado was on the river. It was freeky!

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from Jillian wrote 4 years 49 weeks ago

I never was in a tornado I live in Lexington,OK im hoping I never get in a tornado ever in my life,But you never know!!!!!!!!!

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from Fishingfreak wrote 5 years 13 weeks ago

When I lived in Tennessee, I had a storm in which two funnel clouds come over my house, and in another one (several days later) an f-3 come within a half mile. Our fence was blown a hundred yards.

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from KristenKeys wrote 5 years 13 weeks ago

05/27/97 Buda, Texas tornado survivor here!

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from Bo wrote 5 years 13 weeks ago

Having lived in Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska for almost all of my life, except for my Army days, I have witnessed the devastating effects of tornadoes.
In 1953 or '54, the town of Hebron, Nebraska was pretty much torn up by a tornado. I was a child then, but I still remember the aftermath of that storm. I had family who survivors there.
On May 3,1999, the town of Moore, OK saw many of its homes wiped off their concrete slabs. There is no way to survive the fury of that kind of storm rated an F5, except by taking shelter. Only a below ground storm shelter is sufficient.
And mobile homes ARE tornado magnets. The odds of surviving even a lower rated tornado in a mobile home is about the same as for the people of Nagasaki in August of 1945.
You cannot outrun a tornado but if you are in a car, try to head south as most tornadoes seem to move in a northeasterly direction. Avoidance is your best defense if you are on the road. If it appears you are going to be caught anyway get out of the car and into a ditch. If your car is hit by a tornado and you are in it, you most likely will not survive.
I have seen multiple victims of tornadoes with injuries ranging from minor cuts and scrapes to being crushed by walls and buildings. I have seen people with severe, life-threatening penetration injuries, where pieces of wood, fenceposts and other debris were sticking out of their bodies, some were alive, some not. To say they were devastating injuries is an understatement.

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from Bo wrote 5 years 13 weeks ago

Having lived in Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska for almost all of my life, except for my Army days, I have witnessed the devastating effects of tornadoes.
In 1953 or '54, the town of Hebron, Nebraska was pretty much torn up by a tornado. I was a child then, but I still remember the aftermath of that storm. I had family who survivors there.
On May 3,1999, the town of Moore, OK saw many of its homes wiped off their concrete slabs. There is no way to survive the fury of that kind of storm rated an F5, except by taking shelter. Only a below ground storm shelter is sufficient.
And mobile homes ARE tornado magnets. The odds of surviving even a lower rated tornado in a mobile home is about the same as for the people of Nagasaki in August of 1945.
You cannot outrun a tornado but if you are in a car, try to head south as most tornadoes seem to move in a northeasterly direction. Avoidance is your best defense if you are on the road. If it appears you are going to be caught anyway get out of the car and into a ditch. If your car is hit by a tornado and you are in it, you most likely will not survive.
I have seen multiple victims of tornadoes with injuries ranging from minor cuts and scrapes to being crushed by walls and buildings. I have seen people with severe, life-threatening penetration injuries, where pieces of wood, fenceposts and other debris were sticking out of their bodies, some were alive, some not. To say they were devastating injuries is an understatement.

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from Fishingfreak wrote 5 years 13 weeks ago

When I lived in Tennessee, I had a storm in which two funnel clouds come over my house, and in another one (several days later) an f-3 come within a half mile. Our fence was blown a hundred yards.

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from KristenKeys wrote 5 years 13 weeks ago

05/27/97 Buda, Texas tornado survivor here!

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from Jillian wrote 4 years 49 weeks ago

I never was in a tornado I live in Lexington,OK im hoping I never get in a tornado ever in my life,But you never know!!!!!!!!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Christy wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I was in a tornado once. I was fishing on the Mississippi River and the weather was getting bad so me and my buddy went back to our camp on one of the islands. We waited out the storm in the tent and we could hear trees falling all over. finally the storm slowed down enough to chance going to the boat landing where the van was. We got to the van and turned on the radio and it said the tornado was on the river. It was freeky!

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from mtyburski wrote 7 weeks 3 days ago

Never seen one live, but would be interesting, as far as the science is concerned. Scary experience!

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