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Survival channel

Top Stories

A Cut Above

Axes and hatchets are among man's oldest and most versatile tools. From splitting firewood to breaking down an elk, there isn't much these venerable icons of the outdoors can't do.
1 | Read More

Spy Baits

Although the term "spy-baiting" may conjure up all manner of creative connotations, this relatively new finesse tactic for bass is rather simple.
0 | Read More

Turkey Slam

The turkey world slam took OL's Editor-in-Chief around the world. Check out the photos as Andrew McKean chases gobblers from Florida to Hawaii.
0 | Read More

Top Rangefinders

Today's rangefinders represent a substantial investment, but you get a lot for your money. We tested six of the most feature-packed units to see which are most fieldworthy.
0 | Read More
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Survival Gear

Gear

Big Ass Knives

Snow's favorite big blades, modeled by the hottest hunters on OL's staff.

Get the LED Out

These days, there’s no reason to fumble around in the dark.

Survival Skills

Survival

Ice Capades

Bear these five tips in mind to stay safe on the ice this winter.

Ice Capades

Bear these five tips in mind to stay safe on the ice this winter.

Survival Videos

Daily Blogs

  • April 21, 2014

    Our 10 Favorite Short Axes, Hatchets, and Tomahawks - 0


    Photo by Adam Levey

    1. Wetterlings Cruising Axe
    A graceful combination of design and function, the Cruising Axe features a hand-forged carpenter’s head and gently curved hickory handle. At just over 2 pounds and 23 inches, it’s equally suited to carpentry tasks and more woodsy endeavors like limbing logs and chopping wood. ($131; lie-nielsen.com) [ Read Full Post ]


  • April 21, 2014

    4 Unique Ax Heads and the Jobs They Do - 0


    Photo by Adam Levey

    1. Pulaski
    Among the most recognizable axes is the pulaski, with a grubbing tool opposite the cutting edge. It can drop trees and clear ground to establish firebreaks when fighting wildfires, and also excels for trail building in wilderness areas where the use of power equipment is prohibited. [ Read Full Post ]


  • April 21, 2014

    How to Field Dress Big Game with a Hatchet - 0


    Illustration by Joel Kimmel

    To field dress big game with a hatchet, use it as you would a big belt knife, opening the paunch with a small incision at the base of the sternum. Then, tip the blade at right angles to the animal, with the handle up and your fingers spreading the skin close to the blade as you run it to the rectum. Do not try to cut the skin down into the animal; hair will collect on and dull the blade. Dump the entrails. [ Read Full Post ]


  • April 21, 2014

    Ax Skills: How to Split Firewood - 0


    Illustration by Pete Sucheski

    To split firewood, any ax head will do, but one with a steep bit taper will help cleave your target. The chopping block—broad, knee-high, and firmly set—should support the piece of wood to be chopped where the ax handle will be horizontal at contact. The block also will protect the blade if it drives through. [ Read Full Post ]


  • April 21, 2014

    How to Square a Log - 0


    Illustration by Joel Kimmel

    1. Secure the Log
    To square up a log to make a beam, first cut both ends cleanly and remove the bark. Support it at both ends on wood blocks or logs.

    Secure the log to be squared with a dog or spike to keep it from rotating during the process. [ Read Full Post ]


  • April 21, 2014

    How to Throw a Tomahawk - 0


    Illustration by Pete Sucheski

    Grip the handle well to the rear, thumb extended alongside. Point the ’hawk at the target, cutting-edge down. Raise it over your shoulder, arm slightly bent. Swing your arm forward, releasing the ’hawk when it’s almost horizontal. A snap of the wrist helps clean up the release, but power comes from the arm and shoulder. Too much snap imparts excessive spin and can prevent the ’hawk from sticking. [ Read Full Post ]


  • April 21, 2014

    How to Fell a Tree - 0


    Illustration by Joel Kimmel

    Use a single- or double-bit ax with a long handle and a slim head. Determine the direction in which you want the tree to fall. Make a horizontal cut on that side, then angle your ax down into that cut to chip out a notch. Make sure your first strikes are far enough apart to give your ax room to remove wood as the notch becomes deeper. Depending on the tree and its lean, continue this cut-and-chip action to the center of the tree. A slight twist of the ax head at the end of each stroke will help pop chips free and keep the notch open. [ Read Full Post ]


  • April 21, 2014

    How to Sharpen an Ax - 0


    Illustration by Pete Sucheski

    When sharpening an ax, the most important rule is to hone without heating. Abrasive belts do a good job of shaping and sharpening new axes. Compact units from Work Sharp (worksharptools​.com) are easy to use and run on 110 current. Each comes with three belts of different grit. Avoid electric grinders, though, as they can heat an ax head enough to ruin its temper. Old-fashioned hand- or pedal-turned wheels, with water to dissipate heat, work better—but they’re scarce. [ Read Full Post ]


  • April 21, 2014

    A Cut Above - 1

    Axes and hatchets are among man's oldest and most versatile tools. From splitting firewood to breaking down an elk, there isn't much these venerable icons of the outdoors can't do. [ Read Full Post ]


  • April 21, 2014

    Fishing Tips: Catch Suspended Bass With Spy Baits - 0

    Photo by Nick Ferrari

    Although the term "spy-baiting" may conjure up all manner of creative connotations, this relatively new finesse tactic for bass is rather simple. It's all about reaching and enticing suspended fish by presenting a specially designed bait on a linear course. No up-and-down, hit-or-miss stuff—spy-baits sneak into bass' personal space better than any splashy lure.

    [ Read Full Post ]


  • April 21, 2014

    805-Pound Potential Record Mako Shark Caught on Florida Beach - 2

    An angler team of two cousins reeled in a possible world-record shortfin mako shark from the shore near Pensacola, Fla. last week. Earnie and Joey Polk had intended to keep the potentially controversial catch under wraps, but a passerby snapped this photo when the two stopped for gas. The photo went viral on social media and the story was soon picked up by a local paper. [ Read Full Post ]


  • April 21, 2014

    How to Hunt High-Country Turkeys - 0

    When he ran into my setup, the New Mexican gobbler’s chest seemed unnaturally huge. I assumed it was because he was so puffed up, ready to kick the grits out of the full-strut Hazel Creek tom decoy.

    But later, when I checked my GPS and confirmed the elevation—10,400 feet above sea level—it occurred to me that maybe the tom’s breast was so large because his lungs were freakishly big, an adaptation to living in that thin alpine air.

    The Vermejo Park Merriam’s is easily the highest-altitude gobbler I’ve ever killed, and hunting him reminded me that alpine turkeys are different from their lowland brethren.

    Here’s what to keep in mind as you hunt gobblers above 5,000 feet, which is a pretty common elevation for public-land Merriam’s. [ Read Full Post ]


  • April 21, 2014

    Two Spinnerbait Tactics For Catching Sluggish Bass - 0

    I’ve covered enough bass tournaments to know that cagey anglers unwilling to divulge their tactics will often dodge questions by offering generalities such as “plastics” or “moving baits.” One of the most common tools in that latter group is the spinnerbait. But, as a recent B.A.S.S. Nation Southern Divisional reminded me, success with a moving bait doesn’t necessarily require fast movement.

    Typically, bass have no problem running down this flashy, vibrating object when the water’s warm and the weather’s stable. However, the recent tournament saw a cold front lower air and water temperatures and bring those dreaded high, bright skies as high pressure followed the front’s clearing.

    As the weather stabilized, two particular tactics stood out: [ Read Full Post ]


  • April 21, 2014

    Video: How Many Peeps can a .50 Cal Shoot Through? - 0

    We hope that you had a happy Easter. But, just incase you're absolutely sick of peeps, here's a little video to get you through your Monday.

    The guys from RatedRR lined up a long row of peeps and shot some super slow-motion video of a .50 caliber bullet blasting through them. [ Read Full Post ]


  • April 18, 2014

    Centipede Claws Out of Snake's Stomach - 0


    Photo by Arsovski et al Ecologica Montenegrina

    Mother Nature took the “fight-or-flight response” to new heights when she pitted this nose-horned viper against a centipede.

    Researchers on a field study in Macedonia last year discovered the dead snake with a centipede sticking out from its belly. A dissection of the snake revealed that its internal organs were missing. Researchers believe the centipede might have still been alive at the time it was swallowed, and that it destroyed the snake’s organs while trying to claw its way back out, Livescience reports. A brief report of the incident was recently published in the journal Ecologica Montenegrina. [ Read Full Post ]


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