Make the Shot: Sitting Position

This stable, easy-to-assume position is one of the most accurate shooting techniques.

Shooting from a Sitting Position

Shooting from a Sitting Position

Shooting from a Sitting PositionOutdoor Life Online Editor

The Hasty Sling
The quickest way to get into a solid sitting position.

1. Thrust your arm through the sling so that the strap is resting on your triceps a few inches above your elbow.

2. Sweep your hand and forearm in a circle around the sling and grip the forend of the stock.

3. As you shoulder the rifle, the tension on the sling will lock the butt of the gun in place, giving you a steady shooting platform. If the gun isn't tight to your shoulder, your sling is too long.

Shooting Sticks
A bipod or a pair of shooting sticks, such as these Camo Steady Stix from Stoney Point, can give you a rock-solid hold on your target from the sitting position. About the only limitation of this technique is shooting at running game. There's not much of an arc to swing through before you need to readjust the sticks. ($41; 507-354-3360; stoneypoint.com)

Shooting Sling
The use of a shooting sling, practically a forgotten art among today's hunters, results in great accuracy. A loop at the end of the properly adjusted sling cinches around the bicep and pulls the stock tight against the shoulder when the rifle is raised. Murray's A1 Quick Set Rifle Sling is one of the best. ($50; 817-441-7480; murraycustomleather.com)

Elbows in Front (see photo, upper right)
Put your elbows in front of your knees when shooting from a sitting position. With your elbows on top of your knees or to the side, the position won't be nearly as steady.

45-Degree Rule(see photo, upper right)
Place your feet and legs at about a 45-degree angle to the target when shooting from the sitting position.

Adjust the Tension (see photo, upper right)
When using the hasty sling (pictured) or a proper shooting sling, looping your hand on the forend controls the amount of rearward tension the sling puts on the rifle. Sliding the hand backward increases the tension; sliding it forward reduces it. The tension should be strong enough so that you can work the bolt of the rifle with your trigger hand without having the stock slip out of position or the rifle come off target.