Roboducks Go the Way of Corn

Motion Decoys outlawed in Arkansas

As if duck hunting wasn't hard enough, it will get a little more so for Arkansas hunters next year. The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission voted unanimously to ban any "electronic, mechanically guided, wind-powered or manually powered spinning blade devices that simulate wing movement."

The short of it: No more Roboducks. This ban will become effective for the 2005-06 waterfowl season. Studies in the state indicate that hunters often do kill more ducks with the aid of a motion decoy, including a higher number of juvenile birds. Because of this study some biologists have compared using the devices to a form of baiting.

Since their introduction on the market roughly seven years ago, Roboducks have stirred an ethical debate among waterfowlers. Regardless of your stance on the issue, their popularity cannot be denied. Marion McCollum, owner of Mack's Prairie Wings, figures motion decoys account for nearly $1 million in sales annually.

Looks like it's back to the basics, better dust off that call.