Gun Stories of the Week: Americans Not Duped by Gun Control Deceit

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Pew Poll: Americans not duped by gun control deceit

A Pew Research poll released Dec. 10 shows 52 percent of participants support the protection of gun rights while 46 percent support gun control, marking the first time two decades that Pew has found more support for gun rights than gun control.

According to Pew, support for gun rights has been steadily rising since January 2013, when 45 percent supported protections. During that time period, support for gun control also fell from 51 percent to its current 46 percent.

Pew conducted the survey between Dec. 3-7 among 1,507 adults and has a margin of error of 2.9 percentage points.

According to Pew, 57 percent of those polled said that owning a gun allows for greater protection against crime. Thirty-eight percent said owning a gun is dangerous for personal safety.

Breaking down the numbers by race, ethnicity and political affiliation, the poll found support for gun rights is found mostly among whites, with 61 percent of white Americans backing protections. Gun control, on the other hand, is more popular among minorities, gaining 60 percent of black support and 71 percent of Hispanic support.

However, more than half of the black population polled for the survey -- 54 percent -- agreed that guns protect the lives of their owners rather than endanger them, sending gun control zealots into spasms of angst.

"What's most striking in Pew's new data is that views have shifted more in favor of gun rights … among nearly every demographic group, including women, blacks, city-dwellers, parents, college graduates, millennials and independents," writes Workblog's Emily Badger in a Dec. 10 Washington Post column. "The two groups that haven't budged? Hispanics and liberal Democrats. But the long-term trend is undeniably grim for gun-control advocates, who seem to be losing ground even among their strongest traditional sympathizers."

'Progressives' get regressive in call to revive background check bill

"Progressive" Democratic lawmakers said on Dec. 9 that they plan to push, once again, for universal background checks on all gun sales in the new GOP-controlled Congress in a classic example of redressing the regressive in a cloak of self-delusion.

According to The Hill, the bold pronouncement by the "handful of Democratic lawmakers" did pause to acknowledge reality by noting the revived push for universal background checks "will be an uphill battle, with Republicans taking majority control" of both Houses following November's mid-term rout of Democrats.

Congress voted down the proposed Manchin-Toomey compromise background check bill last spring despite claims that it would have prevented the high-profile shootings gun control advocates celebrate to frighten a gullible public into knee-jerk adherence to their agenda.

Leading lights among the "progressives" include such dyed-in-the-wool liberals as Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.), Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), Rep. Mike Thompson (D-Calif.) and House Democratic Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.).

As part of the vow to revive the background check bill, the Progressive Change Campaign Committee on Dec. 10 launched its “Big Ideas Project,” an initiative aimed at "soliciting proposals from the public" when, in fact, it suggests proposals from the public, such as , hey, let's bring back the background check bill, shouldn't we?

STATE LEGISLATION

Texas bill decriminalizes politically incorrect acts of childhood

Texas, Florida and Oklahoma lawmakers are pondering bills that would prohibit school districts from punishing students who wave around half-eaten pastries that look like a gun, build guns out of Legos, use their fingers to represent guns, play soldier or any other act of childhood that doesn't meet the ever-shifting whims of political correctness.

Texas State Rep. Ryan Guillen filed a bill in late November that, he said, is in response to the two-day suspension given second-grader Josh Welch, 7, by officials at Park Elementary School in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, in March 2013 after he chewed a Pop-Tart into the shape of a gun.

Guillen's House Bill 223 prohibits schools from punishing students who wave around half-eaten pastries that look like a guns, build guns out of Legos, or use their fingers to represent a firearm.

Critics oppose relaxing the "no tolerance" policies that allow school officials to cite rote adherence to a blanket protocol rather than actually have to think. Supporters say it is a step in the right direction toward muzzling zero-tolerance policies and wonder why such a bill is necessary in the first place.

“We need common sense in application of rules," State Rep. David Simpson said. “With zero tolerance rules, we often have no ability to use common sense.”

LITIGATION

Connecticut's knee-jerk gun control laws may get the boot

The U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals heard oral arguments on Dec. 9 from gun rights groups challenging Connecticut's bans on semi-automatics arbitrarily labeled "assault weapons" and high-capacity ammunition magazines, adopted in knee-jerk reaction to the 2012 Newtown massacre.

The Court focused on the popularity and the lethality of AR-15-style and Bushhmaster rifles and the large-capacity ammunition magazines.

According ton the Connecticut Law Review, U.S. Circuit Judge Christopher Droney acknowledged "a potential government interest" in banning certain semi-automatics and high-capacity magazines by citing statistics that show "over 50 percent of recent mass shootings used a combination of the two."

The plaintiffs are a coalition of firearms dealers, sports shooters, gun owners, and Second Amendment rights organizations who brought the suit against the state claiming that the bans infringe upon their Second Amendment rights to possess firearms for self-defense. They appealed to the 2nd Circuit after a lower federal court upheld the post-Newtown gun control law.

The Connecticut Citizens Defense League is among the plaintiffs. League President Scott Wilson told the Hartford Courant that it was a relief to hear the arguments.

“We believe that the firearms in common use in our society today, if possessed by law abiding citizens, are totally within our rights under the second amendment,” he said.

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