Treestand Review: Best New Hang-On Stands

We put a half dozen of the best hang-on treestands to the test. What they lack in the mobility and versatility of their climbing cousins, hang-on-style treestands make up for in convenience, cost, comfort, and safety. Here’s our take on some of the best new stands available.

Ameristep Hyde Sky walker

One-piece cast-aluminum platforms for sitting and standing offer weld-free construction, making the Sky Walker ideal for cold climates, where traditional welded ferrous and aluminum tube stock have a propensity to moan and groan. The stand mounts easily on a rope hanger, simplifying the usually awkward installation process, and an aggressively toothed tree bar bites hard into soft-bark trees, preventing slippage or shifting under weight. The taut trampoline seat is comfortable; however, the folding lumbar support backrest took some getting used to. ($250; ameristep.com)

Big Game Prodigy

The seat and platform of this aluminum stand adjust to fit odd angles, and the large metal platform provides a squeak-free foundation. Its padded shoulder straps proved comfortable and will be appreciated on long hauls to distant stand sites. The seat cover detaches, so you can take it with you to prevent damage from weather and varmints. ($150; ­biggame​treestands.com)

Hawk Helium

As its name implies, this aluminum stand is lightweight (10.5 pounds), and it's also well balanced and easy to hang. The high-quality, 3-inch-thick, layered memory-foam seat is incredibly comfortable. Delrin bushings and washers at friction points keep the noise down as well. ($119; hawkhunting.com)

Lone Wolf Alpha Tech F1

The seat and standing platforms on the Alpha Tech F1 level effortlessly, enabling plumb hunts. The standing platform has the best truss-support system of the field, with a great structural feel. High-quality dual mounting straps solidly cinch the stand to the tree, while their loop ends slip easily over the receiver buttons on the stand's upright. The seat, made of vacuum-formed foam, is quite comfortable, though it could be bigger. ($199; lone​wolf​­huntingproducts.com)

Summit Peak

The Peak is a big stand, with an integrated footrest and padded armrests that contribute to its overall comfort. The footrest's design helps the hunter find the platform's edge without having to look down—a great safety feature for bowhunters concentrating on a shot. The height-­adjustable, trampoline-style seat will keep posteriors happy, and it silently lifts out of the way for standing shots. It is a good value too. The price is right for plus-size hunters who value ample leg and wiggle room. ($130; summitstands.com)

X-Stand X-pedition

Hanging this lightweight stand is simple: Hang the strap-receiver assembly first, then slip the stand over the receiver and pin it in place. The assembly adjusts for leaning tree trunks. The backpacking straps double as attachment straps, saving weight and cinching the stand tight. We'd like to see the grip surface on the standing platform improved. ($219; x-stand.com)