Two Hardy Duck Blinds for You and Your Dog

I grew up hunting waterfowl in the shallow-water sloughs and marshes of eastern Wisconsin. Throughout the season, I got to work in the early-morning hours building a makeshift duck blind. Now, I’m not going to downplay the sheer joy of building your own blind, but it’s far from a perfect situation.

Thankfully, Momarsh Inc. has solved my waterfowling problems with two products that have changed my shallow-water setups: the Invisilab Dog Blind ($190) and the invisichair Blind ($300; momarsh.com).

The Invisilab Dog Blind
Like many waterfowlers, I am almost always accompanied by my retriever. We often hunt a marsh area that is accessible only by canoe. With water levels ranging from about 1 to 3 feet deep, using a field ground blind isn't feasible.

At first, I was content using a dog platform, but I noticed the trampling of the marsh grass after the first few retrieves left our hide looking far too unnatural. Very early in the hunt, I’d be left with a dog that was exposed to birds and weather conditions, compromising my success rate.

Now when I hunt the same marsh, I can deploy a dog blind in just seconds. The Invisilab Dog Blind is an impressive combination of both a ground blind and an adjustable dog platform that provides my dog with sturdy footing and a cover to keep him protected from weather and incoming birds. The cover also features field straps that allow you to add cut brush and grass in order to blend in with the surrounding area.

The Momarsh blind breaks down easily and is light enough to carry over your shoulder, making it a good choice whether you’re walking in or using a boat to access your favorite honey hole.

The Invisichair Blind
One of the best features of the Invisichair is that it keeps you totally hidden from above without rendering your view ineffective. Rather than sitting on a marsh stool surrounded only by the cover on the sides, you're hidden from above in the Momarsh Invisichair. Using the stubble straps strategically placed around the viewing mesh and along the sides, you're able to break up the outline of the blind with natural surrounding cover.

The interior leaves plenty of room to turn your shoulders to keep an eye on passing flocks and adjust your calling with their movements. Rather than your having to tuck your head and calling at birds you can’t see, the Invisichair allows you to work ducks and geese from start to finish, all the way to the hole.

The blind weighs 22 pounds and is not much bigger than a human torso. It features adjustable legs that keep you out of the mud, and it packs down quickly and easily.

Both blinds have been exhaustively field tested, and it shows.