These Girls Can Shoot

Put down your men’s basketball brackets for just a minute and read about a team that made NCAA history this … Continued

Put down your men’s basketball brackets for just a minute and read about a team that made NCAA history this past weekend in another college sport–competitive shooting.

The Texas Christian University Horned Frog Rifle Team won their school’s first-ever NCAA Rifle Championships on Friday and Saturday, posting a two-day aggregate score of 4,675.

And not only did they surpass the shooting prowess of a West Virginia team that was heavily favored to repeat its 2009 title, they did it with a team comprised entirely of women.

You see, in collegiate shooting, there’s no such thing as separate men’s teams and women’s teams.

The Horned Frog women posted a respectable second-place score of 2,314 in smallbore on Friday, following it up with a blistering 2,361 in air rifle Saturday.

Alaska-Fairbanks shot a two-day aggregate score of 4653 to finish in second place, with West Virginia University placing third, Kentucky fourth and Army fifth. A total of eight teams qualified for the finals, which took place at TCU’s home range in Dallas, Texas.

Coming off this weekend’s NCAA Championship performance, five members of the TCU rifle team received All-American honors. Senior Erin Lorenzen joined Sarah Scherer and Sarah Beard as All Americans in both smallbore and air rifle. Team members Simone Riford and Caitlin Morrissey garnered All-American honors in air rifle. The TCU Rifle Team is coached by Karen Monez.

The exceptional performance by the TCU women shooters comes as no surprise to the Outdoor Life Newshound. In my many years of covering competitive shooting, I’ve concluded–generally speaking, of course–that young women are more receptive to coaching and instruction that young men are. Girls and young women also tend to focus better and are better disciplined, both traits extremely vital to good target shooting.

What’s your view?

Oh yeah, Go Frogs!!