Stew Over Lui

Associate Dean and Professor of Law at UC Berkeley School of Law Goodwin Liu, 39, is President Barak Obama's nominee for a seat on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Confirmation hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee are scheduled for next week. However, Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., the ranking GOP member, claims that Liu's failure to submit a complete list of his writings in his Senate questionnaire might place the nomination in jeopardy and is seeking a postponement.

But that may be the least of Liu's problems with conservatives, especially those who are Second Amendment advocates.

Noting Liu's relative inexperience, Guns Rights Examiner David Codrea writes in his April 8 blog, "...what he lacks in experience, he makes up for in radical liberalism. In a recent book that he co-authored, Liu says that, 'Applications of constitutional text and principles must be open to adaptation and change... as the conditions and norms of our society become ever more distant from those of the Founding generation.'"

In other words, Codrea states, "Liu believes that our rights are constantly evolving. The Second Amendment might have been necessary in the 1700s, he believes, but now those rights are no longer necessary. In Liu's world, there would be no gun rights."

Syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin wrote on April 6 that she shared a "cordial dinner once with Goodwin Liu, years and years ago in Washington, D.C. As far as I could tell, his memory back then was in good working order. But now that the radical left-wing law professor has been nominated to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, Liu seems to be suffering from a curious case of selective amnesia" in misrepresenting his views.

Marc Ambinder, the politics editor of The Atlantic, says Liu presents "a classic dilemma for intellectually honest conservatives: he is undeniably brilliant, undeniably qualified to serve, has a great story behind him (son of immigrants who didn't learn English until kindergarten, was a Rhodes scholar, went to Stanford, Yale Law) respected by colleagues bearing various ideologies -- and he is unabashedly (so far are these things go) a judicial liberal."

There's no dilemma for Second Amendment advocates: No Liu.