Ray Eye’s Friday Morning Ramblings

Several times each week, hunting buddy and turkey hunting legend Ray Eye sends e-mails that typically run the gamut from … Continued

Several times each week, hunting buddy and turkey hunting legend Ray Eye sends e-mails that typically run the gamut from the sublime to the ridiculous. Always opinionated, Eye is never shy about sharing his points of view. I thought I’d share this one with you fellow Strut Zoners—Gerry Bethge

Hello everyone, Happy Friday…..

Late night last night at the QDM deer banquet in Fenton, Spent quality time with my buddy Frank; a great time was had by all—of course that is without question when hanging with Frankie. Food was good , visited with lots of old friends and met a surprising number of folks that listen to my radio show. And yes, we ended up at IMO’s Pizza place late last night, man was that good!!!!!

Fall is in the air!!! This has been a wonderful week with several days of temperatures in mid-50s at night. Squirrels are cutting hickory nuts, makes my wonder dog Charlie crazy.. Just too many squirrels to tree as dozens work on nuts and jump from tree to tree.

As much as hate to leave Charlie home on my early morning “Buggy run,” down the dead road to the squirrel patch, there is nothing in hunting to compare with a .22 rifle and squirrels on hickory nuts. As a kid who grew up with squirrel hunting, the sounds of cutting, the early morning light reflecting from cuttings as they flutter down from tall hickories and the light spatter of falling cuttings landing on the forest floor, still excite me and gets the old ticker pumping.

May sound weird, but a finding a squirrel cutting nuts, making the stalk, trying to find him in the forest canopy and getting the shot, watching him tumble to the ground, is right up there with a strutting gobbler coming over a rise to the call or a 10-point buck walking toward me ground level “eye to eye” and me with my recurve bow in hand.

There is a mixed bag of young turkeys this late summer, also seeing lots of hens without poults. Three different size levels of poults seems to be the norm—some hens only have 2 or 3 others 4 to 6. But there are so many very small late-hatch poults, from dove size, to pigeon size and the normal long-legged gangly size for this time of year. Earlier this week on a cool morning at the river, roosted momma hens and babies put on quite the show pitching from the roost and gliding across the river into the field edge.

Gotta go, time to take my dogs on our morning Buggy run, have to have at least one morning for my dogs and let Charlie tree some squirrels as Peanut guards the right flank. Have a great Friday and I’ll see ya on the radio in the morning…. Live Internet streaming at 6 AM at http://www.kfns.com/