Duck Hunting: How to Make Your Own Call Lanyard

Step One
Step One
Start with one 7 1/2-foot and two 6-foot sections of cord. Tie a hangman's knot in one end of each. Trim the excess off to 3/16 of an inch and burn the trimmed end shut. The flame should melt the cord's end so that it "mushrooms" over and forms a permanent seal with the adjoining cordage. This ensures it won't slip in the field. These are the adjustable loops that will hold your calls or dog whistles. Open the loop to put the call in, and then slide it tight. The tighter you tie the hangman's knot, the harder it is to slide the loop tight. I tie them as tight as I can.Outdoor Life Online Editor
Step Two
Step Two
Hold the three loops in front of you and decide where you want them to hang. Do you want them together or staggered? Maybe you want your goose call to hang lower than your duck call. If so, simply leave one loop lower. When you have them arranged the way you like, tie the three cords together with some twine about 4 inches above the highest knot. Whatever you have on hand will work, since you'll be discarding the twine later. Start your braiding at the twine and work toward the ends of the cords. Hold the cords in a vise grip (at the twine) to make braiding easier. Once again, decide how big you want the neck loop of your lanyard to be, and braid the appropriate amount.Outdoor Life Online Editor
Step Three
Step Three
Hold the cords with a clip or vise grip at the spot where you've stopped braiding to keep them from unraveling. Cut the two shortest cords to the braid and fuse them by melting their ends simultaneously and sticking them together. I like to melt the fused ends a second time and squeeze the fuse flat with steel pliers. This allows the braid to lie flat for the final knot.Outdoor Life Online Editor
Step Three
Step Three
Use a modified hangman's knot to connect the ends of the lanyard. Once the knot is complete, trim the excess to 3/16 of an inch and burn the end. Again, allow the cord to mushroom over and seal itself to the adjoining cordage. Remove the twine and your lanyard is complete.Outdoor Life Online Editor

This simple project is a great way to keep all of your small hunting accessories organized in the field.