Going Up the Country

In the midst of a record-breaking heat wave here in New York City, I leapt at the opportunity last week to drive up to rural, verdant Millbrook, NY, and check out CVA's new muzzleloaders for the Fall 2010 hunting season. Here's what I found.
The big story with CVA's 2010 line is that each break-action muzzleloader will feature the Quick Release Breech Plug, which was introduced last fall on the top-of-the-line Apex. The QRBP (shown here in this barrel cut-away) is touted as the only breech plug that can be removed without the use of any tools after the gun has been shot.
Further breech plug design innovation can be witnessed in a groove that has been cut into the end of the QRBP. This groove, or lip, will mate with the angled seat in the barrel's plug chamber, creating an even more secure, airtight fit.
The Accura muzzleloader, first introduced in 2008, has gotten a facelift for the 2010 season and is now known as the Accura V2. The V2 still possesses many of the features of the original--like a trigger guard actuated breeching action, a Bergara barrel and the neutral center of gravity trigger--but a soft-touch coating and rubber grip panels have been added to the stock; stocks are now available in black and Realtree APG; and of course, the QRBP had been integrated.
Bergara barrels, which CVA claims are the most accurate production muzzleloader barrels in the world, are made of 416-grade stainless steel.
The Optima muzzleloader was introduced back in 2003, and it too is getting an upgrade for 2010. The action has been made more compact than that on the original Optima, which has brought the gun's overall weight down (6.65 pounds), and makes it a nimble option for mobile hunters.
The standard stock on the Optima is designed for either open sights or scope mounting and comes with fiber-optic open sights. The thumbhole version has a higher comb that is designed for use with a scope and comes standard with DuraSight Dead-On integral mounts instead of open sights. The retail price will start under $300.
The entry-level Wolf model (look for the price tag to be well under $200) will look a lot different than its predecessor, too. It's got a more compact and lighter weight action, which incorporates an entirely new easier-to-operate breeching system. Like the others, the Wolf has incorporated the Quick Release Breech Plug as standard equipment.
The Wolf is available in standard length and a compact length (with an inch-shorter butt stock) for small-framed adults, kids or hunter's looking for a brush-style muzzleloader. The compact version can be converted to standard length with the purchase of a full-length butt stock.
We also got to shoot the new single-shot Scout. This break-action centerfire rifle will be available in .243, 7mm-08, .270, .30-06 and .35 Whelen. A compact version will be available in .243 only. For our review of the Scout from this year's Gun Test, CLICK HERE.
After the smoke cleared it was time to head back to the irrepressible furnace that is NYC in the summer, but it was good to get up to the country and pull a few triggers. For more info on these guns, check out CVA's web site.