Albino Trophies | Outdoor Life

Albino Trophies

Albino moose are rare for good reason: being all white puts them at a disadvantage. They can't blend in as well to their environment, they're re more easily targeted by predators, and are not as well-equipped to weather cold winters.

"It's not a genetic trait you want to see passed on in wildlife populations," said Scott. "It does not help their chances of survival in the wild."

Mark Scott, director of Wldlife at the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department, says albino moose are extremely rare. He guesses there are only a couple in Vermont.

"Some scientists say probably in the whole moose population, probably 1 in 100,000 is a true albino," said Scott. "This animal appeared to be a true albino -- it had pink eyes, feet, and no color at all."

The hunters behind this kill don't want to be identified, but the moose they harvested, estimated to be about 2 1/2 years old

Albino moose are rare for good reason: being all white puts them at a disadvantage. They can't blend in as well to their environment, they're re more easily targeted by predators, and are not as well-equipped to weather cold winters.

"It's not a genetic trait you want to see passed on in wildlife populations," said Scott. "It does not help their chances of survival in the wild."

Once in a lifetime? One in a million? Yes, that's true, but consider some of these other albino critters--perhaps none more fascinating than these elk.

This series of moose photos were supposedly taken in Alberta.

Moose...elk...how about an albino black bear? This bear was captured by our Bear Management Specialist near Olney, northwest of Kalispell after it got into trouble. They were surprised to find they had an albino black bear, about 4 years old and 150 pounds. Albinos have very poor eyesight and tend to not live as long as a result. However, there have been several albino black bears shot within 30 miles of here and there was an albino bear reported in Columbia Falls earlier this year.

As you can see in the photos, this bear was generally covering its eyes from the light but it has no pigmentation with pink eyes and skin. It was released in Glacier Park where hopefully it will stay out of trouble.

Although pibaldism is fairly commonplace in the whitetail herd, pure albinism is not.

Tags:

Latest


More Stories


Videos