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The answer: They sink. Mule deer antlers sink. See my the blog here.
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Fresh whitetail sheds sink.
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Older, dried-up whitetail antlers sink.
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Ancient, flaking, baked-on-the-prairie-hardpan mule deer sheds sink.
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Even older, wafer-light sheds like this tiny shed sink, though this one demonstrated a little buoyancy until it got entirely waterlogged. Then it stayed on the bottom.
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Doesn’t matter how deep the water. Sheds sink. I tried caribou antlers, but they’re even denser than whitetail sheds.
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You know what doesn’t sink? The hundreds of winterkilled deer carcasses that are floating on our rising floodwater.
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These deer and antelope carcasses are finally thawing out, and bobbing in the current and backwaters in a macabre reminder that Mama Nature is who is in control around here.

Last week I posed a question that many of you knew, but others speculated about: Do shed antlers float or do they sink?

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