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Wisconsin Wolf Hunting Bill Signed, Season to Begin Mid-October

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April 03, 2012
Wisconsin Wolf Hunting Bill Signed, Season to Begin Mid-October - 8

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker signed a bill today allowing wolf hunting in the Dairy State. The season, open to both hunters and trappers, will run mid-October to the end of February. This bill comes after the Federal government delisted wolves as an endangered species in January. Despite this, many view the bill as politically driven, and not based on science. Norm Poulton, regional coordinator for the Department of Natural Resources’ Wolf Recovery Program, believes the bill will greatly reduce, if not destroy, the wolf population. 

“If you look at these bumper stickers, they don’t say 350 wolves, they say no wolves,” Poulton told WJFW.com

Another DNR employee and spokesperson for the wolf hunting bill, Kurt Thiede, says eradicating wolves is not the plan. 

“What we looked for in the legislation was making sure that we had, through rule authority, the ability to regulate permit numbers, set goals, establish zones, and then also close the season by emergency order, if necessary,” said Thiede told WJFW.com, before adding that one of the reasons behind the bill was to help those forced to interact with wolves.  “The current level which they’re at, there are problems being caused across the north for landowners, farmers, that have to coexist with wolves. So we see this as an opportunity, through our delisting and the federal delisting, to help manage that problem.”

One issue that both sides can agree on, however, is that no one knows just how many wolves there are in the state. Estimates run between 350 and 750 animals. Volunteers that assisted in counting the animals have stated that they will no longer participate for fear of leading hunters to wolves.

What do I think about all this? I’ll put it this way: I’ve already called my friend Richard Sanders, who is a landowner and Wisconsin native, to tell him I’ll be visiting sometime this winter. Your thoughts? Comment below!

Click on the following links for more news on wolf hunting in Wisconsin:

Wisconsin Legislators Must Weigh Wolf Hunt Against Native American Traditions
Wisconsin Landowners Will Soon Be Allowed to Shoot Problem Wolves
Wolves in the Great Lakes Region Taken Off Endangered Species List
Wisconsin DNR Calls For Great Lakes Wolves to Be Delisted

Comments (8)

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from Bob Hansen wrote 2 years 14 weeks ago

Hi...

I know it's impossible to track down each wolf to see how many are present, but their (varying) statistics seem to indicate that there are enough wolves to allow hunting and trapping.

I'm sure that their F&G will rake in some additional fees for same. Also, so will the trappers and hunters when successful.

I would like to see an annual limit to the amount of wolves taken, though. This may very each year according to predictions on the then current population of wolves.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hunter_Fass wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

The way Wisconsin estimates wolf populations is different than many other state agencies. Wisconsin’s wolf population is taken each year when the population is at its lowest, usually during or towards the end of winter season and before the new year’s litter. The latest numbers I could find were from 2011 with a minimum population of 751+ wolves outside of Indian Reservations. The total state minimum population was between 782-824 wolves in Wisconsin. It will be interesting to see how our mild winter affected the 2012 wolf population. I am looking forward to participating in the 2012 wolf hunting/trapping season and hopefully be able to do my part as a sportsman to promote the state’s population goal which I believe is 350 wolves.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tylerfreel85 wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Glad to hear this...I'm glad to hear they will allow trapping them too! I'll have to check that book out charlie, another great one is Alaska's Wolf Man, by Jim Rearden!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Thanks for clearing that up Charlie.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

The official wolf population is 700 according to WDNR & FWS the lower numbers come from those who don't want any hunting allowed so they low ball the population.
Most residents think 700 wolves is to low an estimate.
JM, wolves are not hard to find here.
Even before this bill was signed landowners have been quietly with WDNR permits been shooting problem wolves causing property damage.
Anyone interested in getting the feel of what wolf hunting is like should read "Wolf Hunters" by Christopher Batin. It is a great story.
later,
charlie

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Sounds like it could be a pretty challenging hunt(Only 350 Wolves in the state). Good luck to anyone that attempts it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Raymond952 wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

This story needed better fact-checking before being posted online: Norm Poulton is a Regional Volunteer Tracker Coordinator for the DNR Wolf Recovery Program. He does not, as the story implies, work as a DNR employee or speak on its behalf.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Orange Grove wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Right behind you gayne

+2 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)

from Orange Grove wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Right behind you gayne

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Sounds like it could be a pretty challenging hunt(Only 350 Wolves in the state). Good luck to anyone that attempts it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

The official wolf population is 700 according to WDNR & FWS the lower numbers come from those who don't want any hunting allowed so they low ball the population.
Most residents think 700 wolves is to low an estimate.
JM, wolves are not hard to find here.
Even before this bill was signed landowners have been quietly with WDNR permits been shooting problem wolves causing property damage.
Anyone interested in getting the feel of what wolf hunting is like should read "Wolf Hunters" by Christopher Batin. It is a great story.
later,
charlie

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Thanks for clearing that up Charlie.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tylerfreel85 wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Glad to hear this...I'm glad to hear they will allow trapping them too! I'll have to check that book out charlie, another great one is Alaska's Wolf Man, by Jim Rearden!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hunter_Fass wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

The way Wisconsin estimates wolf populations is different than many other state agencies. Wisconsin’s wolf population is taken each year when the population is at its lowest, usually during or towards the end of winter season and before the new year’s litter. The latest numbers I could find were from 2011 with a minimum population of 751+ wolves outside of Indian Reservations. The total state minimum population was between 782-824 wolves in Wisconsin. It will be interesting to see how our mild winter affected the 2012 wolf population. I am looking forward to participating in the 2012 wolf hunting/trapping season and hopefully be able to do my part as a sportsman to promote the state’s population goal which I believe is 350 wolves.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Raymond952 wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

This story needed better fact-checking before being posted online: Norm Poulton is a Regional Volunteer Tracker Coordinator for the DNR Wolf Recovery Program. He does not, as the story implies, work as a DNR employee or speak on its behalf.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bob Hansen wrote 2 years 14 weeks ago

Hi...

I know it's impossible to track down each wolf to see how many are present, but their (varying) statistics seem to indicate that there are enough wolves to allow hunting and trapping.

I'm sure that their F&G will rake in some additional fees for same. Also, so will the trappers and hunters when successful.

I would like to see an annual limit to the amount of wolves taken, though. This may very each year according to predictions on the then current population of wolves.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)

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