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Is TrackingPoint's Precision Guided Firearm the Future of Long-Range Shooting?

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January 15, 2013
Is TrackingPoint's Precision Guided Firearm the Future of Long-Range Shooting? - 7

This new shooting system from TrackingPoint takes fighter jet technology and applies it to long-range shooting. Here's how it works. First the shooter tags his target. Then the scope takes a ballistic formula accounting for distance, wind, elevation, temperature and a wide variety of other factors and tracks the target. The system only allows the shooter to fire when the reticle (or in this case an 'x') is in proper position to hit the target.

This system is being made for military, hunting, and target shooting applications. It's makers say it will cut years off the learning curve for long-range shooting.

Comments (7)

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from Victor Rossi wrote 1 year 12 weeks ago

Question

Does this refugee from a junk yard or gunsmithing nightmare come with an American Walnut stock option?

Just my opinion, but anyone who needs one of these contraptions to enjoy shooting sport of any kind should start looking for another hobby.

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from marksman wrote 1 year 13 weeks ago

AAAAANNNNNNDDDDDDD they start at a pocket change amount of $17500 for a 300 win mag according to the websight. They failed to mention that in the video highlights. That right there will probably be why you will not (probably) see many of them in the field. Lets get some on the folks from Trackingpoint to strap them on their backs and start belly crawling through the weeds, muck, mud, snow, and rain and see how durable the electronics REALLY are???

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 4everAutumn wrote 1 year 13 weeks ago

It sounds great for military use, but if it becomes available for target shooting or hunting, I wouldn’t want any part of it. Doesn’t the satisfaction of a hit come from knowing you could miss?

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from huntfishtrap wrote 1 year 13 weeks ago

Sounds like something our military could use, but I hope it would never be legal for hunting.

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from DSMbirddog wrote 1 year 13 weeks ago

While this is all very exciting it will not be in my future.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 1 year 13 weeks ago

-I can see it being used in the military.
-What's the point of using it for target shooting? Might as well lock it onto a rest and have a robot pull the trigger.
-Hate the idea of it being used for hunting.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 13 weeks ago

Very good article. What happens if the X is located on the other deer right next to the deer you want to shoot? What if the deer is moving? What’s the almighty Boone & Crockett stance on hunters using this technology? What is the tolerance of the X? Very interesting. Sorry if those questions were answered on the video, I just read the article. Right away, I can definitely say the deer herds would drop with this kind of technology if the DNR still issues tags based on old hunting information. A lot of us do not have the time to practice to be good at very long distance shooting for hunting wild game. I would never take a shot over 200 yards with what I have, however if I had the technology that would allow me to take longer shots and know 100% I could make them, myself and others would be limiting out a lot quicker and taking more game than ever before. Once again, thanks for the informative piece.

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from JM wrote 1 year 13 weeks ago

-I can see it being used in the military.
-What's the point of using it for target shooting? Might as well lock it onto a rest and have a robot pull the trigger.
-Hate the idea of it being used for hunting.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 1 year 13 weeks ago

While this is all very exciting it will not be in my future.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntfishtrap wrote 1 year 13 weeks ago

Sounds like something our military could use, but I hope it would never be legal for hunting.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 4everAutumn wrote 1 year 13 weeks ago

It sounds great for military use, but if it becomes available for target shooting or hunting, I wouldn’t want any part of it. Doesn’t the satisfaction of a hit come from knowing you could miss?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from marksman wrote 1 year 13 weeks ago

AAAAANNNNNNDDDDDDD they start at a pocket change amount of $17500 for a 300 win mag according to the websight. They failed to mention that in the video highlights. That right there will probably be why you will not (probably) see many of them in the field. Lets get some on the folks from Trackingpoint to strap them on their backs and start belly crawling through the weeds, muck, mud, snow, and rain and see how durable the electronics REALLY are???

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 13 weeks ago

Very good article. What happens if the X is located on the other deer right next to the deer you want to shoot? What if the deer is moving? What’s the almighty Boone & Crockett stance on hunters using this technology? What is the tolerance of the X? Very interesting. Sorry if those questions were answered on the video, I just read the article. Right away, I can definitely say the deer herds would drop with this kind of technology if the DNR still issues tags based on old hunting information. A lot of us do not have the time to practice to be good at very long distance shooting for hunting wild game. I would never take a shot over 200 yards with what I have, however if I had the technology that would allow me to take longer shots and know 100% I could make them, myself and others would be limiting out a lot quicker and taking more game than ever before. Once again, thanks for the informative piece.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Victor Rossi wrote 1 year 12 weeks ago

Question

Does this refugee from a junk yard or gunsmithing nightmare come with an American Walnut stock option?

Just my opinion, but anyone who needs one of these contraptions to enjoy shooting sport of any kind should start looking for another hobby.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)

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