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Wild Food Guide: How to Identify the Best Wild Edible Foods

Wild Food Guide: How to Identify the Best Wild Edible Foods

OL's survival expert highlights the best wild foods and ranks them by availability and caloric value.
wildediblefood_intro

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from Fishin Magician wrote 1 year 40 weeks ago

GOOD INFO TO HAVE...THANKS

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from Tuesday Stine wrote 1 year 46 weeks ago

Love to see articles like this one. Being able to identify edible wild plants is just as important for survival as catching meat, maybe even more so. Never heard of a "meatatarian." Thanks for listing the elderberry. My all time favorite wild food. The berries are packed with more nutrients than blueberries and can be eaten cooked or dried. An elderberry "vodka" cordial is just the drink for a cold winter day, to remind you of the beauty of late summer. Great book to learn from is "Peterson Field Guides-Edible Wild Plants."

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from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 50 weeks ago

Nice article. Well written. I would love too see more on this topic in the future.

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from Tc505 wrote 1 year 50 weeks ago

you started with the hardest nuts to crack that I have ever seen. hickory nuts and black walnuts?? better carry a vice, chisel and 2 pound hammer with you to crack either of these. for more info on edible and inedible plants go to either the local farm extension at the courthouse or to the library. the local stuff will give you just the local edibles where the library will give you the edibles of the world unless they have one just for n. america. have one of these in my collection along with the local and they are great to have. we have a hazlenut here in la that we call a chinqapin and the squirrels are ferocious over these and you have to get up very early to get them. bad part is you need gloves to get those out of the shell since they are spiny and hurt like the devil if they get into your fingers. by the way a better description of the buckeye is that they look like a hazelnut or chestnut but are black instead of brown/buff like the others. I do with there was a better pic of pine nuts than was shown since peeling the seeds out of a cone is hard and they taste like he77!! must have gotten the wrong thing and tried it. by the way, there is also a medicinal plant book out there that is a must for any outdoorsman's collection!!!! I have that one as well. heartburn?? they taste bad but pine needles work! headache? the green inner bark of willow. so many out there to choose from but very good at what they do at no cost.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tc505 wrote 1 year 50 weeks ago

you started with the hardest nuts to crack that I have ever seen. hickory nuts and black walnuts?? better carry a vice, chisel and 2 pound hammer with you to crack either of these. for more info on edible and inedible plants go to either the local farm extension at the courthouse or to the library. the local stuff will give you just the local edibles where the library will give you the edibles of the world unless they have one just for n. america. have one of these in my collection along with the local and they are great to have. we have a hazlenut here in la that we call a chinqapin and the squirrels are ferocious over these and you have to get up very early to get them. bad part is you need gloves to get those out of the shell since they are spiny and hurt like the devil if they get into your fingers. by the way a better description of the buckeye is that they look like a hazelnut or chestnut but are black instead of brown/buff like the others. I do with there was a better pic of pine nuts than was shown since peeling the seeds out of a cone is hard and they taste like he77!! must have gotten the wrong thing and tried it. by the way, there is also a medicinal plant book out there that is a must for any outdoorsman's collection!!!! I have that one as well. heartburn?? they taste bad but pine needles work! headache? the green inner bark of willow. so many out there to choose from but very good at what they do at no cost.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from peteyraymond wrote 1 year 50 weeks ago

Enjoyed your article, Tim. Now how about a follow-up on inedible wild foods to avoid? You mentioned a few, but I think it would be a good idea to have photos to identify them with.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

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from Tuesday Stine wrote 1 year 46 weeks ago

Love to see articles like this one. Being able to identify edible wild plants is just as important for survival as catching meat, maybe even more so. Never heard of a "meatatarian." Thanks for listing the elderberry. My all time favorite wild food. The berries are packed with more nutrients than blueberries and can be eaten cooked or dried. An elderberry "vodka" cordial is just the drink for a cold winter day, to remind you of the beauty of late summer. Great book to learn from is "Peterson Field Guides-Edible Wild Plants."

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tc505 wrote 1 year 50 weeks ago

you started with the hardest nuts to crack that I have ever seen. hickory nuts and black walnuts?? better carry a vice, chisel and 2 pound hammer with you to crack either of these. for more info on edible and inedible plants go to either the local farm extension at the courthouse or to the library. the local stuff will give you just the local edibles where the library will give you the edibles of the world unless they have one just for n. america. have one of these in my collection along with the local and they are great to have. we have a hazlenut here in la that we call a chinqapin and the squirrels are ferocious over these and you have to get up very early to get them. bad part is you need gloves to get those out of the shell since they are spiny and hurt like the devil if they get into your fingers. by the way a better description of the buckeye is that they look like a hazelnut or chestnut but are black instead of brown/buff like the others. I do with there was a better pic of pine nuts than was shown since peeling the seeds out of a cone is hard and they taste like he77!! must have gotten the wrong thing and tried it. by the way, there is also a medicinal plant book out there that is a must for any outdoorsman's collection!!!! I have that one as well. heartburn?? they taste bad but pine needles work! headache? the green inner bark of willow. so many out there to choose from but very good at what they do at no cost.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from peteyraymond wrote 1 year 50 weeks ago

Enjoyed your article, Tim. Now how about a follow-up on inedible wild foods to avoid? You mentioned a few, but I think it would be a good idea to have photos to identify them with.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tc505 wrote 1 year 50 weeks ago

you started with the hardest nuts to crack that I have ever seen. hickory nuts and black walnuts?? better carry a vice, chisel and 2 pound hammer with you to crack either of these. for more info on edible and inedible plants go to either the local farm extension at the courthouse or to the library. the local stuff will give you just the local edibles where the library will give you the edibles of the world unless they have one just for n. america. have one of these in my collection along with the local and they are great to have. we have a hazlenut here in la that we call a chinqapin and the squirrels are ferocious over these and you have to get up very early to get them. bad part is you need gloves to get those out of the shell since they are spiny and hurt like the devil if they get into your fingers. by the way a better description of the buckeye is that they look like a hazelnut or chestnut but are black instead of brown/buff like the others. I do with there was a better pic of pine nuts than was shown since peeling the seeds out of a cone is hard and they taste like he77!! must have gotten the wrong thing and tried it. by the way, there is also a medicinal plant book out there that is a must for any outdoorsman's collection!!!! I have that one as well. heartburn?? they taste bad but pine needles work! headache? the green inner bark of willow. so many out there to choose from but very good at what they do at no cost.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 50 weeks ago

Nice article. Well written. I would love too see more on this topic in the future.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Fishin Magician wrote 1 year 40 weeks ago

GOOD INFO TO HAVE...THANKS

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

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