Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Essential Food to Pack in Your Bug Out Bag

Syndicate

Syndicate content
Google Reader or Homepage
Add to My Yahoo!

The Survivalist Recent Posts

Categories

Recent Comments

Archives

Survivalist
in your Inbox

Enter your email address to get our new post everyday.

October 09, 2012
Essential Food to Pack in Your Bug Out Bag - 6

Any good Bug Out Bag should include a minimum of gear, most of which would be similar to the gear you would take on a backpacking trip.

Just for starters, you need necessary prescription meds; shelter items; 2 to 3 quarts of water, and purification equipment to disinfect more water; fire starters; first aid supplies; spare clothes; and, of course, some food. But that’s where all of the experts’ opinions diverge from a recognizable average into wildly different food lists based on personal preference and influenced by tastes.

MREs are popular for Bug Out Bag food, and they definitely have the high calories and long shelf life that you need. But they are also bulky and heavy.

Freeze-dried backpacking food can be a lighter-weight choice over the MRE, but they may not work for everybody. The calorie content can be much lower than in freeze-dried meals. They also require extra water and a heating source, and either or both of those could be in short supply during a bug out.

Don’t be skimpy with your meal plan. Running around in the woods can require a lot of energy and you may find yourself blowing through 5,000 calories or more per day. The best foods for that level of exertion are quick-and-easy carbs (starches and sugars) and food high in proteins and fats that provides you with more long-term energy.

So what do you really want to have with you?

Drinks
You need to stay hydrated while bugging out, and you need calories. Packets of apple cider mix, instant teas, and powdered lemonade can add some sugars and keep you drinking.

Breakfast
Granola bars, trail mix, dried fruit, breakfast bars, and protein shakes can provide you with ready-to-eat or just-add-water nutrition. Skip the powdered instant scrambled eggs, as they require getting a heat source going, waiting for water to heat up, and waiting for the nasty stuff to cook/rehydrate.

Lunch
No-cook foods are best, so stick with stuff that’s ready to eat. Tuna pouches, trail mix, peanut butter, jerky, and a host of other lunch snacks can be great choices. Maybe you can treat yourself to an MRE entrée with the water activated heater pouch. This eliminates the need for fire or stove, and gets you a hot meal without the bulk and weight of a full MRE.

Dinner
Your dinner might need to be more substantial than your lunch, but still be something reasonable. It should also serve the purpose of boosting morale. If you’ve had to bug out, something bad has happened. If you are eating dinner from your BOB, you are probably bedding down in a strange place under uncertain circumstances. Have a high calorie can of your favorite stew or chili. Yes, canned food is a little heavy, and you’ll have to find some way to heat it up. But a belly full of calories that you actually enjoyed eating will help you stay warm at night and help you better cope with the situation at hand. Have some crackers and other snacks with your meal, and pack your favorite candy bar for dessert.

Let us know in the comments what tasty vittles you have packed in your BOB.

Comments (6)

Top Rated
All Comments
from fuglybugger wrote 1 year 25 weeks ago

I have to say...

Bug out Bag

it's not what you have to grab to take along with

it's what's already with you

bug out or not

just sayin

a knife helps though

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from fuglybugger wrote 1 year 25 weeks ago

sprout seeds
something that provides living enzymes

toilet paper

rocks against my ass is a last resort.

namaste

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gem wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

I'm a divorced mom with three teen boys who have hollow legs. Because of this, I opted for a "Food BOB" that is separate from our bug out bags. My three boys can take turns carrying it if need be. Each of our BOB's has sea rations (The dry cookie/biscuits that are supposed to taste like lemon) in them, enough for three days each, along with water bladders for each of us mounted in our BOB's. In the Food Bag we have these:
-12 foil packets of tuna, large sized-about 12 oz each
-Jar of mayonnaise, plastic
-Jar of mustard, plastic
-individual packets of relish (instead of a jar of sweet pickles)
-crackers (changed out often as they get stale quick)
-peanut butter, large plastic jar
-jelly, individual packets so they are lightweight
-2 gal. ziplock bag of flour
-1 gal. ziplock back of sugar
-2 gal. ziplock bag of rice
-1 gal. ziplock bag of oatmeal
-1 gal. ziplock bag of cornmeal
-1 gal. ziplock bag of pasta
-1 gal. ziplock bag of tea
-1 gal. ziplock bag of cocoa packets (Swiss Miss)
-1 gal. ziplock bag of garlic powder
-1 gal. ziplock bag of onion powder
-packets of dried cheese powder taken from Kraft Mac & Cheese boxes
-1 lb brick of coffee
-1 gal. ziplock bag of non-dairy powdered creamer-can be used as milk in soup, biscuits, oatmeal, coffee, etc and tastes hella better than dry milk
-1 plastic bottle of oil and/or several sticks of crisco
-Salt & pepper shakers
-small tin of baking powder
-small tin of baking soda
-quart ziplock bag of salt
Plastic plates & bowls, utensils & knives, & sturdy handled cups that can take heat or cold
1 large pot (Lightweight)
1 coffeepot (Lightweight)
1 frying pan (heavy, cast iron but worth every ounce)
1 quart of water
Water purification tablets and a katadyn filter with refill
Assorted other stuff I can't recall at the moment.

Just as an example, I can make one big mean pot of soup with some tuna, cheese powder, creamer, and onion & garlic spices, and not have used very much of any of those ingredients.

It's a pretty heavy bag, all told, but it has handles on each end, and so two people can carry it easily, one person can carry it with a bit of effort. If events transpire that we can't keep carrying it, we can salvage the tuna and whatever else out of it, redistribute that into our BOB's, and leave the rest behind. Feel free to share your thoughts on our "solution" to the Food BOB.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from gandamack wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

Sorry...no edit button.... supposed to say" doesnt hold....water"

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from gandamack wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

thats all well and cool but the weight penalty will always be the bottom line.The less weight in your pack the more you can carry.More food means more time to lay low before having to surface.
There is no freeze dried that cant be prepared with a Kelly Kettle and a couple of pine cones.
As a general rule you can figure 3-4 2 serving FD meals you can carry for every 1 MRE you leave out.
Boost your caloric intake with dehydrated fruit, crackers, peanut butter, etc.Remember, a Bug-Out means you are MOVING to the woods, not going camping.
If you dont have a water purifier(NOT a " filter")you're in a world of hurt anyway, so the water argument against FD does hold....water.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bob Hansen wrote 1 year 27 weeks ago

Hi...

I also used to rely on MREs, but have decided to utilize other food items. In my BOB are MRE crackers, a couple of two-portion freeze-dried meals, and a few tins of herring and sardines. Also some peanut butter. I'll change some of the food items on occasion.

The BOB also contains the means of catching fish and small animals.

The use of my bag...a sling pack...is more for outdoor-type emergencies/survival than for other scenarios.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)

from Bob Hansen wrote 1 year 27 weeks ago

Hi...

I also used to rely on MREs, but have decided to utilize other food items. In my BOB are MRE crackers, a couple of two-portion freeze-dried meals, and a few tins of herring and sardines. Also some peanut butter. I'll change some of the food items on occasion.

The BOB also contains the means of catching fish and small animals.

The use of my bag...a sling pack...is more for outdoor-type emergencies/survival than for other scenarios.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from gandamack wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

thats all well and cool but the weight penalty will always be the bottom line.The less weight in your pack the more you can carry.More food means more time to lay low before having to surface.
There is no freeze dried that cant be prepared with a Kelly Kettle and a couple of pine cones.
As a general rule you can figure 3-4 2 serving FD meals you can carry for every 1 MRE you leave out.
Boost your caloric intake with dehydrated fruit, crackers, peanut butter, etc.Remember, a Bug-Out means you are MOVING to the woods, not going camping.
If you dont have a water purifier(NOT a " filter")you're in a world of hurt anyway, so the water argument against FD does hold....water.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gem wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

I'm a divorced mom with three teen boys who have hollow legs. Because of this, I opted for a "Food BOB" that is separate from our bug out bags. My three boys can take turns carrying it if need be. Each of our BOB's has sea rations (The dry cookie/biscuits that are supposed to taste like lemon) in them, enough for three days each, along with water bladders for each of us mounted in our BOB's. In the Food Bag we have these:
-12 foil packets of tuna, large sized-about 12 oz each
-Jar of mayonnaise, plastic
-Jar of mustard, plastic
-individual packets of relish (instead of a jar of sweet pickles)
-crackers (changed out often as they get stale quick)
-peanut butter, large plastic jar
-jelly, individual packets so they are lightweight
-2 gal. ziplock bag of flour
-1 gal. ziplock back of sugar
-2 gal. ziplock bag of rice
-1 gal. ziplock bag of oatmeal
-1 gal. ziplock bag of cornmeal
-1 gal. ziplock bag of pasta
-1 gal. ziplock bag of tea
-1 gal. ziplock bag of cocoa packets (Swiss Miss)
-1 gal. ziplock bag of garlic powder
-1 gal. ziplock bag of onion powder
-packets of dried cheese powder taken from Kraft Mac & Cheese boxes
-1 lb brick of coffee
-1 gal. ziplock bag of non-dairy powdered creamer-can be used as milk in soup, biscuits, oatmeal, coffee, etc and tastes hella better than dry milk
-1 plastic bottle of oil and/or several sticks of crisco
-Salt & pepper shakers
-small tin of baking powder
-small tin of baking soda
-quart ziplock bag of salt
Plastic plates & bowls, utensils & knives, & sturdy handled cups that can take heat or cold
1 large pot (Lightweight)
1 coffeepot (Lightweight)
1 frying pan (heavy, cast iron but worth every ounce)
1 quart of water
Water purification tablets and a katadyn filter with refill
Assorted other stuff I can't recall at the moment.

Just as an example, I can make one big mean pot of soup with some tuna, cheese powder, creamer, and onion & garlic spices, and not have used very much of any of those ingredients.

It's a pretty heavy bag, all told, but it has handles on each end, and so two people can carry it easily, one person can carry it with a bit of effort. If events transpire that we can't keep carrying it, we can salvage the tuna and whatever else out of it, redistribute that into our BOB's, and leave the rest behind. Feel free to share your thoughts on our "solution" to the Food BOB.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from gandamack wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

Sorry...no edit button.... supposed to say" doesnt hold....water"

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from fuglybugger wrote 1 year 25 weeks ago

sprout seeds
something that provides living enzymes

toilet paper

rocks against my ass is a last resort.

namaste

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from fuglybugger wrote 1 year 25 weeks ago

I have to say...

Bug out Bag

it's not what you have to grab to take along with

it's what's already with you

bug out or not

just sayin

a knife helps though

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)