7 Types of Energy for Survival and Self-Reliance If the Grid Goes Down

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It’s not the end of all life, or even comfort, if the electricity goes out at your home.

Although 1800s visionaries like Thomas Edison, Nikola Tesla, and George Westinghouse paved the way for electricity to transform from a scientific curiosity into the essential power source for modern life, they grew up without it. In fact, the majority of the humans who have ever lived on earth never knew the glowing luminescence of a light bulb or the frostiness of a refrigerator chilled beer. For most modern people, electricity is viewed as absolutely necessary. It’s not. But it sure is nice. Lucky for us, there are plenty of ways to create electricity and other forms of energy for our home or off-the-grid bug out site, without being dependent on the same grid that everyone else is. These are just seven of the energy sources you can harness for emergencies and off-grid living.

1. Solar Electricity
Photovoltaic cells absorb light and convert it into usable electrical power. Power can be used as it's being produced, or stored in batteries for later use – even at night.

2. Solar Heating
The free heat of the sun can be collected to heat your home, make hot water, and even cook your dinner in a solar oven.

3. Windmills and Watermills
These ancient machines date back about 2,000 years and convert the flow of wind or water into mechanical power to drive pumps, grinding stones and simple machinery.

4. Geothermal Energy
This form of energy also dates back centuries, when hot springs were used for heating, though today, it is used for both heating and cooling.

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5. Wind Turbines
These wind powered devices turn the movement of the air into electricity.

6. Hydroelectric Energy
This energy source utilizes water pressure to turn a wheel or propeller that connects to a generator.

7. Stoves and Furnaces
Wood stoves in the home can generate plenty of heat, and larger wood-burning furnaces outside can create both hot water and home heat. With the right tech, you can also generate small amounts of electricity through thermoelectric generation.

Do you have a back-up energy plan? Let us know what charges your battery by leaving a comment.