The Best Ruger 10/22 Stocks, Tested and Reviewed

These stocks are excellent upgrades for your 10/22
The author shoots a custom 10/22 outfitted with an MDT Oryx stock.

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One of the easiest ways to improve the looks and performance of your Ruger 10/22 is with an aftermarket stock. Though Ruger has no shortage of 10/22 models with different stocks on them — I count at least two dozen on their website currently — there are a lot of interesting and innovative aftermarket  options to explore, covering a wide range of prices.

This roundup of the best 10/22 stocks is based on hands-on experience testing different makes and models, from durable budget synthetics to high-end precision stocks to get your favorite 10/22 tuned up for competition.

We dropped a bunch of 10/22 receivers into these stocks and then put them through the wringer at our annual gun test, where we also reviewed the best rifles, handguns and rimfire rifles. Because the universe of 10/22s and their aftermarket parts is so vast, we wanted to put a spotlight on some products specific to the Ruger 10/22, starting with stocks.

The Best 10/22 Stocks: Reviews and Recommendations

Best Budget: Magpul MOE X-22

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Specs

  • Material: Polymer
  • Weight: 18.6 ounces
  • Length: 28 ¾ inches
  • Price: $60

Key Features

  • Includes two inserts to accommodate different barrel profiles
  • Available in four colors: black, flat dark earth, OD green, gray
  • Has integral recessed sling attachment points
  • Forend incorporates M-Lok slots

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Durable
  • Good ergonomics
  • Affordable

Cons

  • Comb height and length of pull are fixed

The Magpul MOE X-22 is a no-nonsense stock that delivers smart features at an affordable price. The stock ships with two inserts to accommodate different barrel profiles, a narrower one for sporter-weight barrels and a wider one for bull barrels.

The stock will work with straight-pull 10/22s as well as traditional semi-automatics. One thing many shooters like about this stock is the design of the grip, which is more vertical than a factory 10/22 carbine. It also has an effective texture molded into it for a solid purchase, which consists of light pebbling on the sides and horizontal cuts on the grip’s leading edge.

The X-22 has two M-Lok slots on the underside of the forend for attaching accessories (like Magpul’s MOE bipod, which is another good value), and two recessed sling attachment points that are molded into the stock.

The 13.5-inch length of pull will work for most shooters. The recoil pad is made of the same material as the rest of the stock and to keep it from moving around on the shooter’s shoulder it has horizontal cuts molded in it. Magpul designed the stock with a substantial recess between the toe and the grip which allows the X-22 to work well with shooting bags.

Best Precision: MDT Oryx Chassis

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Specs

  • Material: 6061 aluminum
  • Weight: 4.2 pounds
  • Length: 32 ¼ inches
  • Price: $430

Key Features

  • Accepts barrels up to 1.250 inches in diameter
  • AR compatible grip
  • Takes standard Ruger 10/22 magazine
  • LOP adjusts from 13 to 13.5 inches

Pros

  • Excellent accuracy
  • Stiff, durable construction
  • Very good ergonomics

Cons

  • Expensive

The MDT Oryx Chassis is the quickest way to convert a Ruger 10/22 into a rifle capable of competing in matches like the NRL 22 Rimfire series.

The Oryx Chassis has been around for a few years, and MDT makes versions that work with centerfire actions from many major manufacturers as well as a number for rimfires, including the CZ 457, Tikka T1X, and the Ruger 10/22.

This is the highest-quality replacement stock we tested and has a price tag to match. But what you get for that money is a chassis with an aluminum bedding block that creates a rock-solid connection between the action and stock.

The MDT Oryx 10/22 Stock

The design of the Oryx reflects MDT’s experience in the long-range shooting and competition arenas. Features like the barricade stop in front of the magazine well, flat-bottomed forend with M-Lok attachment points, fully adjustable butt stock, and the easy-to-replace AR-style grip are desirable elements on competition chassis.

Our Oryx had no issues accommodating the fat carbon fiber barrel we had on our 10/22, and was easy to assemble. We added a short section of Pic rail under the forend to attach a bipod and were good to go.

This was arguably the best 10/22 stock of the test, and certainly the top pick for turning a 10/22 into a long-range squirrel sniper. We got ours in OD Green, but it can be had in gray, black, and FDE as well.

Most Versatile: Luth MCA-22 (Modular Chassis Assembly)

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Specs

  • Weight: 2.09 pounds
  • Length: 27 to 30 3/4 inches
  • Materials: High-strength glass filled nylon, 6061 aluminum, and steel
  • Price: $190

Key Features

  • All critical stock dimensions can be adjusted
  • Has seven M-Lok slots (five on the bottom of the forend, and one on each side)

Pros

  • Length of pull and cheek height adjust without tools
  • Ambidextrous grip
  • Easy to add accessories

Cons

  • A bit pricey

This clever stock strives to be a one-size-fits-all solution for the 10/22 thanks to the amount of adjustability with the cheekpiece, butt stock and recoil pad, letting the shooter dial in a custom fit.

When the two thumbwheels on the cheek piece are loosened, the shooter can move it up and down over a 2-inch range — from 1 inch below the bore height to 1 inch above — in .09-inch increments. The thumbwheels can be fully unscrewed to reposition the cheek piece forward and backward as well.

The Luth 10/22 stock

The butt stock also has two thumbwheels for altering the length of pull (LOP). The range of travel on the recoil pad is 3.75 inches, letting you set the LOP from 11.25 to 15.75 inches in .375-inch intervals. The recoil pad can also be moved up and down by an inch.

So in a flash the stock can be altered to accommodate a small-framed young shooter or a hulking professional wrestler.

The stock has an aggressive aesthetic that amps up the cool factor but will leave those with more traditional sensibilities a bit indifferent.

A bunch of us have spent time shooting this stock and came away impressed by its functionality. It isn’t at the top of the heap in terms of precision, but for all around versatility it is hard to find a 10/22 stock that offers more for the price.

Best Takedown: Tactical Solutions X-RING Takedown Barrel and Stock Combo

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Specs

  • Material: Polymer
  • Weight: 18.25 ounces (stock only)
  • Length: 19 1/2 (stock only)
  • Price: $525

Key Features

  • Comes with Tactical Solutions X-Ring TD barrel
  • Stock stores three 10/22 magazines under cheekpiece
  • Rifle breaks down quickly for easy storage and transport

Pros

  • Compact design
  • Barrel comes threaded and includes open sights
  • Accurate
  • Durable and ergonomic design

Cons

  • Requires 10/22 takedown receiver
  • Pricey
The Tacsol takedown 10/22 stock

This is one of the coolest 10/22 takedown stocks out there. Tactical Solutions takes a Magpul X-22 Backpacker stock (see below) and adds their own excellent X-Ring TD barrel to the package. All you have to do is supply a 10/22 takedown receiver and put it together.

If you want to go full custom, get a Brownells BRN-22 Takedown Receiver and pair it with this stock and barrel. That’ll result in about the most accurate takedown 10/22 you can build. (You’ll still need to add a bolt and trigger pack to complete the rifle.)

I’ve had a lot of experience with Tactical Solutions barrels over the years and they all deliver good accuracy and good looks, thanks to their high-quality craftsmanship and excellent finishes.

Best Takedown 10/22 (Stock Only): Magpul X-22 Backpacker Stock

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Specs

  • Material: Polymer
  • Weight: 18.25 ounces
  • Length: 19 ½ inches when taken down
  • Price: $115

Key Features

  • In-stock Ruger 10/22 magazine storage
  • Comes with two cheek risers, one for open sights the other for use with an optic
  • Non-slip rubber recoil pad

Pros

  • Compact
  • Affordable

Cons

  • Requires a 10/22 takedown receiver

If you already have a Ruger 10/22 takedown you’re fond of and don’t want to add an aftermarket barrel like the Tactical Solutions X-Ring TD, you can simply purchase the X-22 Backpacker Stock from Magpul and save some money.

The X-22 has a 60-degree grip angle that puts the trigger hand in a favorable position that many shooters prefer. The stock also has the ability to incorporate QD attachment points, which are sold separately.

When the rifle is broken down, the forend clips into the butt stock, creating a single, portable package.

This is an ideal stock to convert a takedown 10/22 into a rugged rimfire that’s ideal for survival, backwoods travel, or to keep stashed in a vehicle.

Best Bullpup 10/22 Stock: Desert Tech Trek-22 Stock Kit

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Specs

  • Material: Fusion injected GRP (Glass Reinforced Polymer)  
  • Weight: 20.8 ounces
  • Length: 26 ¼ inches
  • Price: $299

Key Features

  • Significantly reduces overall length of a 10/22 rifle
  • Has M-Lok mounting slots
  • Stock stores two 10/22 rotary magazines
  • Available in FDE, gray, and OD Green

Pros

  • Makes the 10/22 even more compact and portable
  • Durable
  • Easy to attach

Cons

  • So-so trigger pull
The bullpup 10/22 stock

Desert Tech makes one of the coolest bullpup switch-barrel precision rifles out there, so it isn’t surprising that they developed a stock for Ruger 10/22s that mimics that compact platform.

When the barreled action of a 10/22 is dropped into the Trek, the receiver ends up under the shooter’s cheek, shrinking the overall length of a 10/22 by several inches.

To enhance the utility of a 10/22, the Trek has several M-Lok compatible slots on the forend, along with a Picatinny rail that runs along the top of the stock from the trigger guard forward.

The stock has a clamshell design that wraps around the barreled action. The two halves of the clamshell are held together with about a dozen fasteners scattered about the stock.

Magazines load into the receiver just behind the grip, and to make sure you can keep the lead flying the stock has recesses that can store two extra rotary 10/22 magazines.

Like Desert Tech’s centerfire rifles, the Trek is tough and is a good option for building the ultimate rimfire truck gun. The Trek will work with barrels up to .920 inches in diameter.

Best Traditional 10/22 Stock: Hogue 10/22 Rubber Overmolded Stock

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Specs

  • Material: Synthetic with overmolded rubber
  • Weight: 2 pounds, 1 ounce
  • Length: 28 inches
  • Price: $81

Key Features

  • Two swivel studs
  • Recoil pad

Pros

  • Good ergonomics
  • Aids accuracy

Cons

  • LOP might be too long for smaller shooters

For shooters who prefer rifles with a traditional look, Hogue overmolded rubber stocks are a great choice. They are sturdy, stiff, comfortable, and blessed with good looks.

They come in a number of finishes, which affect their price a bit, but we think the olive drab version matches well with either blued or stainless 10/22s and still comes in at a very affordable level.

The stocks have a recoil pad and two swivel studs, and the overmolding provides great grip in any type of weather. The LOP is fixed at 13 ¾ inches, making this an adult-sized stock.

Different versions of this stock have different sized barrel channels. With the “standard” profile, the channel is .682 inches at the tip of the forend, while the stocks not labeled “standard” have a channel that is .969 inches across.

Removing the action screw on a 10/22 stock
Simply remove the action screw to pull your 10/22 barreled action out of the stock and drop it into your new one.

Photo by Scott Einsmann

Good Value: Blackhawk Axiom

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Specs

  • Material: Fiberglass-reinforced Polymer
  • Weight: 1 pound, 2 ounces
  • Length: 26 to 28 ⅜ inches.
  • Price: $96

Key Features

  • Six-position LOP adjustment
  • Ergonomic pistol grip
  • Accepts all barrel profiles

Pros

  • Durable construction
  • Will fit many sizes of shooters

Cons

  • Forend has a bit of flex

This is a basic stock for upgrading a Ruger 10/22. The most notable feature is the six-position LOP adjustment on the butt, which is similar to those on many AR-15s. It allows you to quickly set the LOP between 9.75 and 13.5 inches, making it a good choice for young shooters.

The Blackhawk Axiom stock in action.

The stock doesn’t weigh much — only 18 ounces — enhancing the rifle’s portability. The forend slopes down and away from the receiver, creating plenty of clearance for the barrel, though the gap is large enough that you’ll want to keep an eye on that space to make sure leaves and foliage don’t get caught in there while chasing squirrels.

The forend also has a swivel stud to attach a bipod. The Axiom is available in tan as well as black.

Final Thoughts on the Best 10/22 Stocks

Adding a new stock to a 10/22 is as simple as it gets. Just loosen the two screws that hold the action and original stock together and drop it into the upgrade. (Though you might have to take off the barrel band on some 10/22s too, which is one tiny additional step.)

A fresh stock can change how your 10/22 shoots, handles, and feels. And it is often the initial step in the journey toward full-on customization with a replacement barrel, trigger, and other components. The ease with which you can do this is one reason the Ruger 10/22 has enduring appeal.

Whether you want to keep your 10/22 as an all-around rimfire or give it a more narrowly defined niche application (survival, long-range precision, etc.), adding one of the products from this list of the best 10/22 stocks is a good place to start.

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John B. Snow

Shooting Editor

John B. Snow is Shooting Editor of Outdoor Life, where he oversees the publication’s firearms and shooting coverage. This includes gear reviews, features on technical innovations, stories on shooting techniques and general hunting coverage with the occasional fishing story thrown into the mix. Originally from Seattle, he has lived all over the country, crisscrossing it by car and truck no fewer than 10 times as he’s moved from one location to the next. Since 2010 he has lived in Bozeman, Montana where he currently resides with his bird dog, Roo.

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