Brady Campaign Has Far Exceeded Original Mission

There were many articles, columns and blogs written last week marking the 30th anniversary of the attempted assassination of President Ronald Reagan that left White House Press Secretary James Brady partially paralyzed.

The legacy of that day, March 30, 1981, in Washington, D.C., was the foundation of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, spearheaded by Brady's wife, Sarah, initially, but now dominated by gun-control zealots with their own agenda.

Among the "common sense gun restrictions" fostered by the Brady Campaign since its 1985 founding is the Brady Law, which requires background checks on handguns purchased at federally licensed dealers; banning of armor-piercing "cop-killer" bullets; outlawing metal-detector-evading "plastic" guns; support of laws to limit illegal gun trafficking; and more scrutiny on "corrupt" gun dealers.

But according to Brady Campaign President Paul Helmke -- an avowed opponent of the Second Amendment in deeds if not in rhetoric -- perhaps the group's most enduring influence is its well-financed cadre of attorneys who provide an "outstanding and unique advocacy in the courts," seizing every opportunity it can to chip away at the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

What happened to Jim Brady was horrible. But the Brady Campaign has far exceeded its mission to support "common sense gun restrictions" and address the causes of gun violence and has, instead, embarked on a far more expansive course with you and your Second Amendment rights in its crosshairs.