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Survival Gear: Grate Chef Firestarter Packets

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December 02, 2013
Survival Gear: Grate Chef Firestarter Packets - 3

Considering the wintery weather we are already encountering in late fall this year, you better be ready to do some fire building in the event you get into trouble over the next few months. Cold, wet, and windy conditions make fire building a very difficult chore. Use this time to stock up on lighters, matches, and various forms of tinder and fuel to add to your emergency equipment. When it comes to fuel, it’s hard to beat the good old cotton ball soaked in petroleum jelly, but Grate Chef FireStarter packets make a great back up.

Available in Europe for years, fire staring packs are a more recent introduction to the shelves of many American grocery and home improvement stores. They’re often found next to the charcoal and lighter fluid, or the grilling equipment. The non-toxic contents (which include aliphatic hydrocarbons, urea-based resins, and paraffin) are stored inside small waterproof packets, each measuring 2.5 x 2.5 inches and weighing about ⅓ of an ounce.

When you’re ready to light your fire, grill, stove, or hearth, just apply an open flame to the corner of one packet, and it will begen to burn and ignite the paraffin. Each FireStarter pack burns for roughly 9 to 10 minutes, even in bad weather. With the right fire-building materials in place (like good tinder, kindling, and firewood), this 10-minute window of flame should be more than enough time to get a fire going, even with damp materials. A package of Grate Chef FireStarters contains 6 separate packs and retails for about $3.

Compared to similar products, I found the Grate Chef a little difficult to light, but once lit it produced a flame almost a foot tall. I wasn’t able to light the Grate Chef packets with ferrocerium rods, but an open flame from a match or lighter worked just fine.

What’s in your emergency fire-building kit? Do you have favorite igniters and accelerants? Let us hear them in the comments.

Comments (3)

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from Bo wrote 32 weeks 2 days ago

I don't carry matches at all; i do carry at least five ways to start a fire; magnesium fire starter that is pre-shaved and stored in a 35 mm film canister as well as the bar that the shavings came from so I have a striker bar. I also carry a Strike Force, a little sparky, and several other flint and steel devices such as the Swedish FireSteel.
I also make small fire starters out of cardboard egg cartons. dryer lint and paraffin wax. Lint or cotton from OTC medication bottles are also included.
The biggest thing that most people do wrong is they carry stuff they don't know how to use. I have never used matches in the fireplace in the house that I live in currently. (And have since 1994) I alternate between each of the tools that I carry so if I need to use any of them, i have the psychomotor skills to do, even under extreme stress. Having been a medic in the Army forty plus years ago, we were trained in survival and search and rescue, i know that people who try a skill they are not completely comfortable with when unstressed will be unsuccessful to a large degree in a true survival situation. Having the right equipment means nothing if you can't do it when the stuff hits the fan. Everything that you think you know goes out the window and you become a search and recovery statistic rather than a rescue. Hate it when that happens.

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from buckeye wrote 32 weeks 3 days ago

Fire kit includes strike anywhere matches for whem I am at elevation, a bic lighter, ferrocerium rod, vasoline and cotton balls, a few sticks of fat wood, and some twine.

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from MazPower wrote 32 weeks 4 days ago

I've used WetFire for years and love it. It's very light weight, catches easy and burns hot for a long time. It evens burns while floating on water.

Chef Grate looks like it's pretty good too, I may have to try it out.

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from MazPower wrote 32 weeks 4 days ago

I've used WetFire for years and love it. It's very light weight, catches easy and burns hot for a long time. It evens burns while floating on water.

Chef Grate looks like it's pretty good too, I may have to try it out.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckeye wrote 32 weeks 3 days ago

Fire kit includes strike anywhere matches for whem I am at elevation, a bic lighter, ferrocerium rod, vasoline and cotton balls, a few sticks of fat wood, and some twine.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bo wrote 32 weeks 2 days ago

I don't carry matches at all; i do carry at least five ways to start a fire; magnesium fire starter that is pre-shaved and stored in a 35 mm film canister as well as the bar that the shavings came from so I have a striker bar. I also carry a Strike Force, a little sparky, and several other flint and steel devices such as the Swedish FireSteel.
I also make small fire starters out of cardboard egg cartons. dryer lint and paraffin wax. Lint or cotton from OTC medication bottles are also included.
The biggest thing that most people do wrong is they carry stuff they don't know how to use. I have never used matches in the fireplace in the house that I live in currently. (And have since 1994) I alternate between each of the tools that I carry so if I need to use any of them, i have the psychomotor skills to do, even under extreme stress. Having been a medic in the Army forty plus years ago, we were trained in survival and search and rescue, i know that people who try a skill they are not completely comfortable with when unstressed will be unsuccessful to a large degree in a true survival situation. Having the right equipment means nothing if you can't do it when the stuff hits the fan. Everything that you think you know goes out the window and you become a search and recovery statistic rather than a rescue. Hate it when that happens.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)

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