Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Outdoor Life's No-Excuses Guide To Hunting The Rut

Outdoor Life's No-Excuses Guide To Hunting The Rut

We put together the 32 most common excuses for failing to take a buck during the rut and then give you the solutions.
rutspecial_01

Comments (9)

Top Rated
All Comments
from bioguy01 wrote 1 year 40 weeks ago

#32 - I find more often than not, "fidgeting" is not as much of a problem as hunters putting too much confidence in their "scent eliminating" sprays. As a deer biologist, I have spent countless hours in tree stands observing deer behavior. Despite what you might think, deer have terrible eyesight. If you see a deer snap it's head up and look in your direction 50+ yards away, take note of the wind direction immediately! More often than not, you will find that the deer busted you with its nose and turned its head in your direction to find you. Generally, if it's a doe, that's when the stomping and head bobbing starts. If its a buck, it might blow and take off, or it might quietly turn around and high-tail it out of there.

I have darted several deer in completely open stands with absolutely no cover make substantial movements to make the shots. A favorable wind cannot be underestimated. The effective range of a dart gun is 20 yards, and you only get 1 shot...there's no room for error!

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bioguy01 wrote 1 year 40 weeks ago

#18 - Shoot coyotes when you can because the opportunities are rare! If you're playing the wind properly, you should be able to kick some leaves on it under your tree stand and continue hunting. Just be sure to pack it out after your hunt.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bioguy01 wrote 1 year 40 weeks ago

For #11, I don't fully agree with the post-rut hunting strategy. Hunting food sources post-rut can be very productive IF you haven't pressured those food sources throughout the hunting season. Bucks are worn down after the rut, and especially in northern areas they need to replenish their bodies as much as possible going into winter. In Northern regions, brassicas, soybeans, and standing corn make great post-rut hunting plots!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Catpool9 wrote 2 years 20 weeks ago

What a wealth of knowledge for all hunters to know, thanks!

David H.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from cobaltss41 wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

I agree there is some good advice in these articles. I think alot of hunters should read these because sometimes you just lose sight and get discouraged. You always got to think it will be worth the wait.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from dneaster3 wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

the last one is my favorite!

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM1993 wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

Youngsters need it just as much as the old timers =]

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from FULL RUT wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

This is some awesome stuff man so much info even after 22 years of hunting good info i wish every one read and understand # 16 man that ATVs no joke i have that problem every year with people that i hunt with .

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Don Mitchell wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Some real good advice in this article, keep em coming, even us old timers need some at times.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)

from FULL RUT wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

This is some awesome stuff man so much info even after 22 years of hunting good info i wish every one read and understand # 16 man that ATVs no joke i have that problem every year with people that i hunt with .

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from dneaster3 wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

the last one is my favorite!

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Don Mitchell wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Some real good advice in this article, keep em coming, even us old timers need some at times.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from cobaltss41 wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

I agree there is some good advice in these articles. I think alot of hunters should read these because sometimes you just lose sight and get discouraged. You always got to think it will be worth the wait.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM1993 wrote 2 years 22 weeks ago

Youngsters need it just as much as the old timers =]

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Catpool9 wrote 2 years 20 weeks ago

What a wealth of knowledge for all hunters to know, thanks!

David H.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from bioguy01 wrote 1 year 40 weeks ago

For #11, I don't fully agree with the post-rut hunting strategy. Hunting food sources post-rut can be very productive IF you haven't pressured those food sources throughout the hunting season. Bucks are worn down after the rut, and especially in northern areas they need to replenish their bodies as much as possible going into winter. In Northern regions, brassicas, soybeans, and standing corn make great post-rut hunting plots!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bioguy01 wrote 1 year 40 weeks ago

#18 - Shoot coyotes when you can because the opportunities are rare! If you're playing the wind properly, you should be able to kick some leaves on it under your tree stand and continue hunting. Just be sure to pack it out after your hunt.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bioguy01 wrote 1 year 40 weeks ago

#32 - I find more often than not, "fidgeting" is not as much of a problem as hunters putting too much confidence in their "scent eliminating" sprays. As a deer biologist, I have spent countless hours in tree stands observing deer behavior. Despite what you might think, deer have terrible eyesight. If you see a deer snap it's head up and look in your direction 50+ yards away, take note of the wind direction immediately! More often than not, you will find that the deer busted you with its nose and turned its head in your direction to find you. Generally, if it's a doe, that's when the stomping and head bobbing starts. If its a buck, it might blow and take off, or it might quietly turn around and high-tail it out of there.

I have darted several deer in completely open stands with absolutely no cover make substantial movements to make the shots. A favorable wind cannot be underestimated. The effective range of a dart gun is 20 yards, and you only get 1 shot...there's no room for error!

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)

1 of 32
bmxbiz