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A Muletail Buck?

A Muletail Buck?

OL’s Hunting, Editor Andrew McKean, shot this northeastern Montana buck on the last day of the season. Is it actually a cross between a mule deer and a whitetail?
muletail_intro

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from Jeff Gailus wrote 23 weeks 4 days ago

Looks like a muley to me. Lots of these in the Bitterroot. I just shot one yesterday that looks the same. The key is the metatarsal gland on the lower rear leg, which I’ll wager it up high, large and surrounded by brown hair. Genetic research in MT indicates there are very few hybrids in MT.

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from Luke Johnson wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

That's pretty sweet! I've chased a few of these hybrid bucks over here in WA state, I've yet to connect on one yet though. Keep up the good work!

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from fdgfhgj wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

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from H380 wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

Great story and photos.. disagree that this is a hybrid .. lots of muleys have Wt. looking racks where 4x4 typical muleys have been shot out .{ case of natural selection ?} 160 score is way high.. check the metatarsal glands for sure to see if it is hybrid 2-3 inches long there is a good chance ..if this is a hybrid then so is Wt. in article Public land Bruisers .. sorry

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from hanshi wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

At first I was ready to say, "hybrid" as the two species do hybridize from time to time. However when the testicular cancer was mentioned I had second thoughts.

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from QDMGuy wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

My guess would be a mule deer with the key being the testicular problem. Antlers can grow many different "deformities" for a wide range of reasons. You would definitely need a little more information on the animal (like the aforementioned gland size) to give an accurate diagnosis.

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from cjohnsrud wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

I like Birdhunter's theory. I think he may be onto something. I hope none of those stinky whitetails are bringing down a strong Mulies genes!!

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from neuman23 wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

whatever it is, its a nice deer! congrats!

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from Sasquatch12 wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

The face, ears, tail and coat are ALL mule deer. While I can see the antlers "look" like a whitetail, they're also all mule deer. I shot a huge 3x5 mulie and the 3 point side looked exactly like this one. Any 3 point blacktail here on the island has an identical antler configuration.

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from joshd wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

Just your everyday mule deer. They really dont hybridize very often. Most often I believe a hybrid will look more like a whitetail (tail and face) but a mulie looking rack and greyer coat. your surefire answer was eluded to in a previous post: the metatarsal gland (outside bottom half of hind leg). It wil be a good 4-5" on a mulie, but maybe and inch on a whitey...on a hybrid?? usually 2-3".
awesome topic, and I think real good info. for people to know.

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from buckhunter63 wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

I have shot a few of these hybrid Muletails in Montana. The ones' I've shot where in central Montana. Big Timber area 15- 20 years ago. I don't have pictures but I do have the antlers and they look like whitetail, but the the bodies where definitely Mulie. Big swopping main beams, no forks, tall g1,g2, and g3. Big Mulie bodies, 200+ lbs.Love to hunt them MULIES!!

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from birdhunter wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

This is no Hybred, your discription of the testicles tells the story. A mule deer with no or limited testosterone will grow non-typical horns.

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from birdhunter wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

This is no Hybred, your discription of the testicles tells the story. A mule deer with no or limited testosterone will grow non-typical horns.

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from gabbered wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

it's a Hybrid Holiday Mule-Tide deer.

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from windmantex wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

I've read the best way to tell is by the size and shape of the glands on their hind legs, dont remember all the details. Have also heard that a hybrids flight response can get mixed up, instead of running flatout like a whitetail or bounding (stotting) like mule deer, they kind of run around in a confused kind of way seeming not to be sure what to do.

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from mitter78 wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

It is not that uncommon for whitetails and mule deer to cross breed, especially in areas where their home ranges intersect each other. In my opinion this deer is clearly a hybrid of both a mule deer and whitetail deer. The body size and rack depict a whitetail, but the rest of him looks like a mule deer. Regardless, that is a nice looking deer with an even better story to go along with it. Congrats.

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from birdhunter wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

This is no Hybred, your discription of the testicles tells the story. A mule deer with no or limited testosterone will grow non-typical horns.

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from mitter78 wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

It is not that uncommon for whitetails and mule deer to cross breed, especially in areas where their home ranges intersect each other. In my opinion this deer is clearly a hybrid of both a mule deer and whitetail deer. The body size and rack depict a whitetail, but the rest of him looks like a mule deer. Regardless, that is a nice looking deer with an even better story to go along with it. Congrats.

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from windmantex wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

I've read the best way to tell is by the size and shape of the glands on their hind legs, dont remember all the details. Have also heard that a hybrids flight response can get mixed up, instead of running flatout like a whitetail or bounding (stotting) like mule deer, they kind of run around in a confused kind of way seeming not to be sure what to do.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from joshd wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

Just your everyday mule deer. They really dont hybridize very often. Most often I believe a hybrid will look more like a whitetail (tail and face) but a mulie looking rack and greyer coat. your surefire answer was eluded to in a previous post: the metatarsal gland (outside bottom half of hind leg). It wil be a good 4-5" on a mulie, but maybe and inch on a whitey...on a hybrid?? usually 2-3".
awesome topic, and I think real good info. for people to know.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sasquatch12 wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

The face, ears, tail and coat are ALL mule deer. While I can see the antlers "look" like a whitetail, they're also all mule deer. I shot a huge 3x5 mulie and the 3 point side looked exactly like this one. Any 3 point blacktail here on the island has an identical antler configuration.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from QDMGuy wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

My guess would be a mule deer with the key being the testicular problem. Antlers can grow many different "deformities" for a wide range of reasons. You would definitely need a little more information on the animal (like the aforementioned gland size) to give an accurate diagnosis.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from birdhunter wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

This is no Hybred, your discription of the testicles tells the story. A mule deer with no or limited testosterone will grow non-typical horns.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from neuman23 wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

whatever it is, its a nice deer! congrats!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from cjohnsrud wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

I like Birdhunter's theory. I think he may be onto something. I hope none of those stinky whitetails are bringing down a strong Mulies genes!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from gabbered wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

it's a Hybrid Holiday Mule-Tide deer.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter63 wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

I have shot a few of these hybrid Muletails in Montana. The ones' I've shot where in central Montana. Big Timber area 15- 20 years ago. I don't have pictures but I do have the antlers and they look like whitetail, but the the bodies where definitely Mulie. Big swopping main beams, no forks, tall g1,g2, and g3. Big Mulie bodies, 200+ lbs.Love to hunt them MULIES!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from hanshi wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

At first I was ready to say, "hybrid" as the two species do hybridize from time to time. However when the testicular cancer was mentioned I had second thoughts.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from H380 wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

Great story and photos.. disagree that this is a hybrid .. lots of muleys have Wt. looking racks where 4x4 typical muleys have been shot out .{ case of natural selection ?} 160 score is way high.. check the metatarsal glands for sure to see if it is hybrid 2-3 inches long there is a good chance ..if this is a hybrid then so is Wt. in article Public land Bruisers .. sorry

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from fdgfhgj wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

welcome come to:===== http://tinyurl.com/297sxrk ====

you can find many cheap and fashion stuff
welcome come to:==== http://tinyurl.com/297sxrk ====

you can find many cheap and fashion stuff
dxfgfdgdf

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Luke Johnson wrote 3 years 18 weeks ago

That's pretty sweet! I've chased a few of these hybrid bucks over here in WA state, I've yet to connect on one yet though. Keep up the good work!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jeff Gailus wrote 23 weeks 4 days ago

Looks like a muley to me. Lots of these in the Bitterroot. I just shot one yesterday that looks the same. The key is the metatarsal gland on the lower rear leg, which I’ll wager it up high, large and surrounded by brown hair. Genetic research in MT indicates there are very few hybrids in MT.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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