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Go Native: 6 Indigenous Plants For Your Next Food Plot

Go Native: 6 Indigenous Plants For Your Next Food Plot

Planting your food plots with indigenous forage species benefits both your land and the wildlife that use it.
gonative1

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from turkey decoy wrote 1 year 28 weeks ago

love www.food-plots-for-deer.com

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from Kody wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Charlie, you are a wealth of information.

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from Kody wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Yes Charlie, there are several cultures that speak of planting trees whose shade for the next generation will come to enjoy. In this case it would mean giving something back to the wildlife to ensure they will remain healthy for the next generation to enjoy.
I planted a large burr oak in my front yard a few years ago. the fellow at the tree nursery led us out to this large burr oak. I laughed when I told him, "That is just great, you bring us out to see the most expensive tree in the whole place." "No," he said, "I can give you a great deal on the tree but getting it to your home and lifting into ground will require a large truck and a crane." As you know, I have both so I loaded it and lifting into place. The digging took some time but I still remembered how to use a shovel. Those oak trees have character.

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from trapper vic wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

Oaks are a good food source but it takes 15 years for them to produce acorns. We have lost all of our elms to dutch elm desease. Are the varieties you mentioned immune to it. Clover is the best bet of the bunch!

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from gjlocy wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

A few years back during the Pennsylvania archery season in I observed a deer chewing off the leaves from poison ivy growing up a tree. Never thought that it was a staple of their diet. Who would have thought!?

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from charlie elk wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

Burr oaks abound in WI. They mast heavy about every other year. Wildlife of all types prefer them to white oaks because the burr acorns are smaller and contain less tannin than whites.
If you or I plant burr oaks kody they are for the next generation's pleasure. But hey someone has to do it. ;)
Red / black oaks are valuable because they mast every year, leaves stay on very late into the winter and fall off sporadically so that they lay about on top of the snow. Deer eat the leaves all winter.
later,
charlie

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from JM wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

@Kody,
I know Bur Oaks are in the White Oak group(Deer like white oaks more than red because they do not contain as much tannin), so I am sure deer would enjoy them. I have never been around Bur Oaks though, so I can't be for sure.

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from Kody wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

I am looking at acquiring a plot of land in an area where we hunt. While oak trees are not common in Alberta, the Burr Oak is doing well in many of our urban areas. They seem to be hardy enough to handle our harsh climate though they are very slow growers. I had not considered the acorns as food for anything other than squirrels so the idea of wild deer having the acorns on the ground in new to me and something something worth doing. I am not sure that the Burr Oak produces lots of acorns?? when you plant a tree like this you are in for the long term.

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from nitrojoe wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

A food plot of poison ivy, poison oak and greenbrier sounds like a great idea. I think you need a new title for your article, "Hell Plots."

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from Kody wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

I am looking at acquiring a plot of land in an area where we hunt. While oak trees are not common in Alberta, the Burr Oak is doing well in many of our urban areas. They seem to be hardy enough to handle our harsh climate though they are very slow growers. I had not considered the acorns as food for anything other than squirrels so the idea of wild deer having the acorns on the ground in new to me and something something worth doing. I am not sure that the Burr Oak produces lots of acorns?? when you plant a tree like this you are in for the long term.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from gjlocy wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

A few years back during the Pennsylvania archery season in I observed a deer chewing off the leaves from poison ivy growing up a tree. Never thought that it was a staple of their diet. Who would have thought!?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from nitrojoe wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

A food plot of poison ivy, poison oak and greenbrier sounds like a great idea. I think you need a new title for your article, "Hell Plots."

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from JM wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

@Kody,
I know Bur Oaks are in the White Oak group(Deer like white oaks more than red because they do not contain as much tannin), so I am sure deer would enjoy them. I have never been around Bur Oaks though, so I can't be for sure.

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from charlie elk wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

Burr oaks abound in WI. They mast heavy about every other year. Wildlife of all types prefer them to white oaks because the burr acorns are smaller and contain less tannin than whites.
If you or I plant burr oaks kody they are for the next generation's pleasure. But hey someone has to do it. ;)
Red / black oaks are valuable because they mast every year, leaves stay on very late into the winter and fall off sporadically so that they lay about on top of the snow. Deer eat the leaves all winter.
later,
charlie

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from trapper vic wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

Oaks are a good food source but it takes 15 years for them to produce acorns. We have lost all of our elms to dutch elm desease. Are the varieties you mentioned immune to it. Clover is the best bet of the bunch!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kody wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Yes Charlie, there are several cultures that speak of planting trees whose shade for the next generation will come to enjoy. In this case it would mean giving something back to the wildlife to ensure they will remain healthy for the next generation to enjoy.
I planted a large burr oak in my front yard a few years ago. the fellow at the tree nursery led us out to this large burr oak. I laughed when I told him, "That is just great, you bring us out to see the most expensive tree in the whole place." "No," he said, "I can give you a great deal on the tree but getting it to your home and lifting into ground will require a large truck and a crane." As you know, I have both so I loaded it and lifting into place. The digging took some time but I still remembered how to use a shovel. Those oak trees have character.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kody wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Charlie, you are a wealth of information.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from turkey decoy wrote 1 year 28 weeks ago

love www.food-plots-for-deer.com

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