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It takes dedication to pass a possible 190-inch non-typical whitetail buck with your bow. But that’s what Edmond, Okla., hunter Zack Meadows, 42, did on Nov. 3 in Logan County, according to the Oklahoman newspaper.

Meadows was hunting his own land looking for a giant typical he had recent photos of from trail cameras. But a 180- to 190-inch non-typical buck showed in front of his stand, tempting him to shoot what would have been his best buck with a bow. But he passed on it.

“I see him [the nontypical] get all puffed up and licking his lips – acting scared,” Meadows told the Oklahoman. “I thought ‘what in the world could be out here scaring this deer.’ I knew something was happening. I start looking around and I could see the antlers [of the bigger buck] coming.”

The two deer squared off, buck posturing and sparring, until the larger typical buck ran the lesser 190-inch non-typical away. The bigger buck stopped at 60 yards, and Meadows made the long bow shot count. The giant whitetail fell after going only 25 yards.

“I never thought in a million years I would shoot a deer that big,” says Meadows, who runs a petroleum business in Edmond.

The newspaper reports that Terry Mayberry of Terry’s Taxidermy in Oklahoma City unofficially green-scored Meadows 16-point, 7-year old buck at 210 inches. This would top the current Oklahoma typical-rack bow buck record of 188 5/8s, taken by Gunner Womack in Pawnee County in 2019. It’s also bigger than the state’s current typical buck by any method, a 194-incher from Pushmataha County by John Ehmer in 2007.

“It’s definitely got a chance,” Mayberry said. “He’s got quite a few deductions on him [Meadows’ buck]. “Until they get an official score [after a 60-day drying period], it’s hard to say. He’s got all those kickers on him that are deducts but he’s definitely got the mass and got the circumference [to be a record].”

Oklahoma Bowhunter Passed on 190-inch Buck to Kill an Even Bigger Record Whitetail
If the score holds up, Meadows’ buck will be the new Oklahoma state record.

Meadows says 20 years of being selective with his buck harvests, limited hunting pressure, and trail camera monitoring allowed him to take his 16-point trophy.

“That’s been huge, staying out of there as much as we can and not checking trail cameras every day,” he told the Oklahoman.

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