Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Labrador Retriever Still Most Popular Dog in U.S.

Syndicate

Syndicate content
Google Reader or Homepage
Add to My Yahoo!

Gun Dogs Recent Posts

Categories

Recent Comments

Archives

Gun Dogs
in your Inbox

Enter your email address to get our new post everyday.

January 31, 2013
Labrador Retriever Still Most Popular Dog in U.S. - 16

We can argue about which breed of dog is the best in the hunting fields, but when it comes to sheer popularity (be that the field or lounging in the living room) the Labrador retriever is top dog in the U.S. once again.

Holding a 22-year reign, Labradors have tied the poodle for most consecutive appearances in the top slot. German shepherds once again claim the second spot, while golden retrievers, or swamp collies as some Lab folks like to call them, hold the third spot. Beagles were the fourth-most registered dog in the country (dropping from third) followed by the bulldog (the other dog that occupies my home; yeah, that’s right, I’m a regular trend setter with two in the top five…).

Big dogs are seeming to make a comeback, displacing little kicking-sized dogs that were the arm-candy fad of actresses and other idiots. "Bigger breeds are making their move," said AKC spokeswoman Lisa Peterson. "The bulldog has muscled his way into the top five, displacing the popular Yorkie, which dropped to sixth.”

With complementary nod to the NFL draft’s Mr. Irrelevant, the English Foxhound was the least registered purebred. It must have something to do with their penchant to interrupt the hunt for tea and crumpets that doesn’t sit well on this side of the pond…

Comments (16)

Top Rated
All Comments
from hmmmAnd wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

Not knocking the labs, but the reason people choose them is because because the are popular, it was the same with cockers spaniels, and unfortunately the breed will suffer for it. I recently bought an English Springer, mine is a very intelligent dog, that once I started training him picks up direction within just a couple tries, the trainers are dumbfounded by how quickly he picks things up. Plus he is small enough that my young kids can handle him. My neighbors with labs are astounded by how much less he sheds than their lab. His only possible down side is he has a much higher energy level than a lab - even those his own age. Which, isn't really a down side IMO.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

HAHA.....

-3 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntfishtrap wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

We own an 11 year old half-black half-yellow lab that we've had since she was a pup, and you couldn't ask for a better dog. Doesn't surprise me a bit that most people agree that labs are awesome.
Not to get off topic, but why don't you guys take your little pi$$ing contest over to the feral cat article where it belongs. I think there are legitimate cases to be made for each viewpoint, but not here.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

Isn't it fun to stir the pot.

-5 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

schmakenzie,
This a dog thread, let's respect the other users and attempt to stay on topic, I answered you on the "Killer Cat" thread.
later,
charlie

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

Charlieelk, Did you say you are from Wisconsin? Section 951.02 of the Wisconsin Statutes states that "No person may treat any animal, whether belonging to the person or another, in a cruel manner." The only exception indicated in this law is for "bona fide experiments carried on for scientific research or normal and accepted veterinary practices." "Cruel" is defined in section 951.01 as "causing unnecessary and excessive pain or suffering or unjustifiable injury or death." Section 174.01, which restricts killing of dogs, states that it does not apply "to a person killing his or her own dog in a proper and humane manner." I do not know how Wisconsin courts have interpreted these two sections of law together but it is clear that section 951.02 prohibits causing unjustifiable death to an animal, even by owners.

A few years ago voters in Wisconsin approved a referendum supporting hunting of feral cats but, thankfully, that proposal was never enacted. Cats are protected under section 951.02. I think that most judges would determine that shooting cats violates section 951.02.

Good Day Charlie Elk!

-4 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

charlieelk, "You are wrong about the illegality/legality issues with your blanket statement." Please show me. "Intentionally killing a cat is a criminal offense in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, regardless of ownership. Anti-cruelty laws apply to all cats—companion, abandoned, lost, and feral—and there is no such thing as a “piping plover defense." - This is not a blanket statement this is the truth.

-4 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

As is my custom I give +1s to everyone (except myself) making a comment, even those I may disagree with get a +1, figure, in a small way it helps promote robust discussions.
Apparently some self righteous user went through in the dark night giving -1 to all.
Whomever you are -- have a nice day.
later,
charlie

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

OK schmakenzie you want to debate kitties I posted a reply to you over the Killer Cat post. Sorry I didn't see you calling me out there. You are wrong about the illegality/legality issues with your blanket statement.
Thanks for the defense JM.

On another matter concerning Labs: My initial comment was meant as a little snark to Brian's last line in his post about English Foxhounds - I happen to like Foxhounds, tea and crumpets..:))))
later,
charlie

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

For the record, my comment was not meant to be taken negative. The reason I said it was because Anti-Cruelty laws do not cover everything.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

JM, Really - Let’s set the record straight: Intentionally killing a cat is a criminal offense in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, regardless of ownership. Anti-cruelty laws apply to all cats—companion, abandoned, lost, and feral—and there is no such thing as a “piping plover defense. Where do you read it is legal to kill cats JM, please fill us in?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

@schmakenzie,
Learn the laws before you accuse someone of doing something illegal.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

charlieelk,
I would have guessed that you had a good retriever killing 50 cats a year illegaly. It's just my turn to stir the pot.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

Yeah I know sometimes I just can't resist stirring the pot a bit. LOL Good answer 4everAutumn ;)
later,
charlie

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 4everAutumn wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

Never understood their popularity, Charlie? to us lab folks, that’s like not understanding the popularity of breathing. And yes, it’s the duck thing. It’s also the goose thing, the pheasant thing, the quail thing, the turkey thing, the snipe thing, the woodcock thing, the rail thing, the dove thing, the everything.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

Owned a lab once and have never understood their popularity. Its got to be the duck thing..
Now that wolf hunters have cleared the legal hurdles in Wisconsin watch for the Wolf Hounds to make a surprise comeback.;)
later
charlie

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)

from charlie elk wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

As is my custom I give +1s to everyone (except myself) making a comment, even those I may disagree with get a +1, figure, in a small way it helps promote robust discussions.
Apparently some self righteous user went through in the dark night giving -1 to all.
Whomever you are -- have a nice day.
later,
charlie

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

schmakenzie,
This a dog thread, let's respect the other users and attempt to stay on topic, I answered you on the "Killer Cat" thread.
later,
charlie

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntfishtrap wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

We own an 11 year old half-black half-yellow lab that we've had since she was a pup, and you couldn't ask for a better dog. Doesn't surprise me a bit that most people agree that labs are awesome.
Not to get off topic, but why don't you guys take your little pi$$ing contest over to the feral cat article where it belongs. I think there are legitimate cases to be made for each viewpoint, but not here.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 4everAutumn wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

Never understood their popularity, Charlie? to us lab folks, that’s like not understanding the popularity of breathing. And yes, it’s the duck thing. It’s also the goose thing, the pheasant thing, the quail thing, the turkey thing, the snipe thing, the woodcock thing, the rail thing, the dove thing, the everything.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

Yeah I know sometimes I just can't resist stirring the pot a bit. LOL Good answer 4everAutumn ;)
later,
charlie

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

@schmakenzie,
Learn the laws before you accuse someone of doing something illegal.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

OK schmakenzie you want to debate kitties I posted a reply to you over the Killer Cat post. Sorry I didn't see you calling me out there. You are wrong about the illegality/legality issues with your blanket statement.
Thanks for the defense JM.

On another matter concerning Labs: My initial comment was meant as a little snark to Brian's last line in his post about English Foxhounds - I happen to like Foxhounds, tea and crumpets..:))))
later,
charlie

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

Owned a lab once and have never understood their popularity. Its got to be the duck thing..
Now that wolf hunters have cleared the legal hurdles in Wisconsin watch for the Wolf Hounds to make a surprise comeback.;)
later
charlie

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

charlieelk,
I would have guessed that you had a good retriever killing 50 cats a year illegaly. It's just my turn to stir the pot.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

JM, Really - Let’s set the record straight: Intentionally killing a cat is a criminal offense in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, regardless of ownership. Anti-cruelty laws apply to all cats—companion, abandoned, lost, and feral—and there is no such thing as a “piping plover defense. Where do you read it is legal to kill cats JM, please fill us in?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JM wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

For the record, my comment was not meant to be taken negative. The reason I said it was because Anti-Cruelty laws do not cover everything.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from hmmmAnd wrote 1 year 10 weeks ago

Not knocking the labs, but the reason people choose them is because because the are popular, it was the same with cockers spaniels, and unfortunately the breed will suffer for it. I recently bought an English Springer, mine is a very intelligent dog, that once I started training him picks up direction within just a couple tries, the trainers are dumbfounded by how quickly he picks things up. Plus he is small enough that my young kids can handle him. My neighbors with labs are astounded by how much less he sheds than their lab. His only possible down side is he has a much higher energy level than a lab - even those his own age. Which, isn't really a down side IMO.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

HAHA.....

-3 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

charlieelk, "You are wrong about the illegality/legality issues with your blanket statement." Please show me. "Intentionally killing a cat is a criminal offense in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, regardless of ownership. Anti-cruelty laws apply to all cats—companion, abandoned, lost, and feral—and there is no such thing as a “piping plover defense." - This is not a blanket statement this is the truth.

-4 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

Charlieelk, Did you say you are from Wisconsin? Section 951.02 of the Wisconsin Statutes states that "No person may treat any animal, whether belonging to the person or another, in a cruel manner." The only exception indicated in this law is for "bona fide experiments carried on for scientific research or normal and accepted veterinary practices." "Cruel" is defined in section 951.01 as "causing unnecessary and excessive pain or suffering or unjustifiable injury or death." Section 174.01, which restricts killing of dogs, states that it does not apply "to a person killing his or her own dog in a proper and humane manner." I do not know how Wisconsin courts have interpreted these two sections of law together but it is clear that section 951.02 prohibits causing unjustifiable death to an animal, even by owners.

A few years ago voters in Wisconsin approved a referendum supporting hunting of feral cats but, thankfully, that proposal was never enacted. Cats are protected under section 951.02. I think that most judges would determine that shooting cats violates section 951.02.

Good Day Charlie Elk!

-4 Good Comment? | | Report
from schmakenzie wrote 1 year 11 weeks ago

Isn't it fun to stir the pot.

-5 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment (200 characters or less)