Whitetail Deer: 5 Scent Control Blunders To Avoid

We all know scent control is of utmost importance when hunting whitetails. Still though, many of us are getting winded … Continued

We all know scent control is of utmost importance when hunting whitetails. Still though, many of us are getting winded in the woods because of carelessness on this front.

Of course, no one can ever completely beat a whitetail’s nose 100 percent of the time, but by paying attention to the details and avoiding laziness, we can improve our odds. Today, I’m sharing five areas of concern that are often overlooked when it comes to reducing human odor. Avoid these scent control gaffes, and you’ll be one step closer to beating that big buck’s nose.

1. Backpack
Most people carefully store and spray their jacket, pants, and hats before heading out hunting, but simply leave their backpack in the back seat of the truck. Give your backpack the same scent control treatment as your clothes since it contains just as much—if not more—scent-absorbing fabric.

2. Binoculars
Your binocular straps are frequent carriers of human scent. They’re typically left on truck dashboards and then grabbed at the last second before a hunt, where they remain slung around your sweaty neck. Make sure to spray those straps down.

3. Bow release
Speaking of cloth items that are often forgotten: Your bow release is another strong carrier of human scent that rarely gets sprayed down before hunts. Fortunately, it’s a quick fix.

4. Treestands
Hang-on or climber stands are tossed in the back of the truck and then immediately grabbed to head for the woods, with little to no thought about what kind of odors might be on the straps or seat. Don’t make that mistake.

5. Your Mouth
Many hunters have bought into the scent-free shower routine before hunting, but then forget completely about one of the greatest sources of odor on the human body—the mouth. Make sure you’re not letting morning breath ruin your hunt. Brush your teeth or try some of that scent eliminating gum or mouth wash. Or, better yet, bite into nature’s natural bad breath eliminator: an apple.